www.wvgazettemail.com U.S. and World http://www.wvgazettemail.com Gazette archive feed en-us Copyright 2016, Charleston Newspapers, Charleston, WV Newspapers Clinton wins historic nomination, says glass ceiling cracked http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ01/160729635 GZ01 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ01/160729635 Tue, 26 Jul 2016 19:00:19 -0400 By Julie Pace and Catherine Lucey The Associated Press By By Julie Pace and Catherine Lucey The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Taking on the role of devoted political spouse, former President Bill Clinton declared his wife Hillary Clinton an impassioned "change-maker" as he served as character witness on the night she triumphantly became the first woman nominated for president.

She put an electrifying cap on the night, appearing by video from New York and declaring, "We just put the biggest crack in that glass ceiling yet."

Minutes earlier, the former president said, "She's been worth every single year she's put into making people's lives better." First lady for his presidency, she's now the Democratic Party's standard-bearer in the race for the White House.

For a man more accustomed to delivering policy-packed stem-winders, Clinton's deeply personal address underscored the historic night for Democrats, and the nation. If she wins in November, the Clintons would also be the first married couple to each serve as president.

She will take on Donald Trump, who won the Republican nomination a week ago. Trump, who campaigned Tuesday in North Carolina, mocked the former president's speech in advance, calling him "over-rated."

At Trump's convention last week, Clinton was the target of blistering criticism of her character and judgment, a sharp contrast to the warm and passionate woman described by her husband. Seeking to explain the vastly different perceptions of his wife, Clinton said simply, "One is real, the other is made up."

The former president traced his relationship with his wife back decades, recalling in great detail the first time he spotted her on a law school campus and the impact she had on pushing him into politics. He took voters back to a time when their relationship wasn't the subject of intense public scrutiny, including during his affair that led to his impeachment as president.

Clinton closed the second night of the Democratic convention, a jubilant celebration of Hillary Clinton's formal nomination for president. In an important move for party unity, her primary rival Bernie Sanders helped make it official when the roll call got to his home state of Vermont, prompting delegates to erupt in cheers. It was a striking parallel to the role Clinton played eight years ago when she stepped to the microphone on the convention floor in Denver in support of her former rival, Barack Obama.

This time, Clinton shattered the glass ceiling she couldn't crack in 2008.

She leads a party still grappling with divisions. Moments after Clinton claimed the nomination, a group of Sanders supporters left the convention and headed to a media tent to protest what they said was their being shut out of the party. At the same time, protesters who had spent the day marching in the hot sun began facing off with police.

Trump cheered the disruptions from the campaign trail. In North Carolina, he told a convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars that, "our politicians have totally failed you."

Indeed, Clinton's long political resume - secretary of state, senator, first lady - has sometimes seemed an odd fit for an electorate deeply frustrated with Washington and eager to rally around unconventional candidates like Trump and Sanders. Many voters have questions about her character and trustworthiness, suggesting she's used her access to power to her personal advantage.

President Clinton spoke after three hours of testimonials from lawmakers, advocates, celebrities and citizens who argued otherwise. Each took the stage to vouch for her commitment to working on health care, children's issues and gun control.

"Hillary Clinton has the passion and understanding to support grieving mothers," said Sybrina Fulton, whose son Trayvon Martin was killed in 2012. "She has the courage to lead the fight for commonsense gun legislation."

The significant time devoted to the testimonials underscored the campaign's concerns about how voters view Clinton. Public polls consistently show that a majority of Americans don't believe she is honest and trustworthy. That perception that was reinforced after the FBI director's scathing assessment of her controversial email use as secretary of state, even though the Justice Department did not pursue charges.

President Clinton complicated the email controversy last month when he met privately with Attorney General Loretta Lynch in the midst of the FBI investigation. Republicans cast the meeting as a sign that the Clintons play by different rules, while Democrats bemoaned that at the very least, it left that impression.

The former president has campaigned frequently for his wife during the White House race, but mostly in smaller cities and towns, part of an effort by the campaign to keep him in a more behind-the-scenes role. His convention address was his highest profile appearance of the campaign.

Clinton's landmark achievement saturated the roll call with emotion and symbols of women's long struggle to break through political barriers. Jerry Emmett, a 102-year-old woman born before women had the right to vote, cast the ballots for Arizona.

Martha McKenna, a Clinton delegate from Maryland, said the night felt like a celebration for Sanders' campaign as well as Clinton's. She added, "The idea that I'm going to be here when the first woman president is nominated is overwhelming."

The Democratic convention drew the party's biggest stars to sweltering Philadelphia for the week-long event. On Monday night, first lady Michelle Obama made an impassioned case for Clinton as the only candidate in the presidential race worthy of being a role model for the nation's children. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden will speak Wednesday, along with Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, Clinton's new running mate.

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AP writers Kathleen Hennessey, Kathleen Ronayne, Ken Thomas and Matthew Daly in Philadelphia contributed to this report.

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Follow Julie Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC and Catherine Lucey at http://twitter.com/catherine_lucey

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Sanders supporters: Unmoved by plea to support Clinton http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ0113/160729671 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ0113/160729671 Tue, 26 Jul 2016 14:40:18 -0400 By GEOFF MULVIHILL and MEGAN TRIMBLE The Associated Press By By GEOFF MULVIHILL and MEGAN TRIMBLE The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Undeterred by Sen. Bernie Sanders' plea for party unity behind Hillary Clinton, Sanders supporters chanting "Bernie or bust!" took to the streets under the hot sun Tuesday for more demonstrations on Day 2 of the Democratic convention.

Several hundred gathered around noon in a rally at City Hall with plans to join up in the afternoon with groups decrying police brutality and economic injustice. Together they planned to march the 4 miles down Broad Street to the convention site.

Speakers at the rally charged that Clinton cheated her way to the nomination with the complicity of the "corporate media."

Demonstrators said they weren't swayed by Sanders' speech at the convention Monday night, in which he said: "Based on her ideas and her leadership, Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States. The choice is not even close."

"He persuaded no one to vote for Hillary," said Greg Gregg, a retired 69-year-old nurse from Salem, Oregon. He said he intends to vote for Green Party candidate Jill Stein, quoting the turn-of-the-last-century socialist labor leader Eugene Debs as saying, "I'd rather vote for what I want and lose than what I don't want and win."

On Monday evening, police cited 54 people for disorderly conduct for trying to climb the barriers outside the convention center during a pro-Sanders protest that reflected the tensions inside the hall between the Vermont senator's supporters and Clinton's.

The Sanders camp was angered when a trove of hacked emails released over the weekend showed that officials at the supposedly neutral Democratic National Committee played favorites during the primaries and worked to undermine Sanders' campaign.

Black Men for Bernie founder Bruce Carter said Monday's speeches from Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren did not persuade him to support Clinton.

"They really agitate people more every time they stand up and do the Hillary Clinton, hoo-rah hoo-rah," he said. Carter, a Dallas resident, said he doesn't fear a Donald Trump presidency: "I've lived under nine white presidents in my lifetime."

With temperatures climbing again toward the mid-90s, Chris Scully, a 28-year-old an engineer from Troy, New York, held a "Jill Before Hill" outside City Hall and said he opposes Clinton because of her war record as secretary of state.

As Scully spoke, a passer-by called out: "That's a vote for Trump!"

Police estimated 5,500 people took part in Monday's protests. Many of the marchers chanted, "Hey, hey, ho, ho, the DNC has got to go!" and carried signs reading "Never Hillary," "Just Go to Jail Hillary" and "You Lost Me at Hillary."

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History and hostility as Clinton ascends to nomination http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ0113/160729688 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ0113/160729688 Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:22:29 -0400 By KATHLEEN HENNESSEY and CALVIN WOODWARD The Associated Press By By KATHLEEN HENNESSEY and CALVIN WOODWARD The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) - A glass ceiling is shattering at the Democratic National Convention as Hillary Clinton ascends to the presidential nomination with Tuesday's roll call of the states, making her the first woman to lead a major party into a White House race.

But as history is being made, hostility is being heard, too. Rhetorically, at least, die-hard Bernie Sanders' supporters also are breaking some glass, loudly protesting his treatment by the party and still cold to Clinton even as Sanders appeals for Democrats to unify and defeat Republican Donald Trump, "a bully and a demagogue."

What was expected to be a tightly orchestrated convention, run with all the professionalism and experience that were lacking at Trump's often-chaotic affair in Ohio, instead showed its rough edges in the early going, starting with chants of "Bernie" during the opening invocation and boos at numerous mentions of Clinton's name.

First lady Michelle Obama gave a heartfelt endorsement of the candidate who engaged her husband in a fierce struggle for the nomination in 2008. "I trust Hillary to lead this country," she said in a speech that provided a parent's-eye view of the White House and its power.

Liberal favorite Elizabeth Warren, senator from Massachusetts, and Sanders himself also gave the party something to cheer about Monday night.

While Mrs. Obama has often avoided overt politics, her frustration with Trump's rise was evident. Without naming him, she warned that the White House couldn't be in the hands of someone with "a thin skin or a tendency to lash out" or someone who tells voters the country can be great again. "This right now, is the greatest country on earth," she said.

Sanders took the stage to a sustained roar and shouts of "We love you, Bernie." Some of his supporters were in tears.

While asserting "our revolution continues," the Vermont senator implored his restive followers to get behind Clinton. On issues of poverty, immigration, environmental protection and more, he said, Clinton's election counts. "If you don't believe that this election is important," he said, "take a moment to think about the Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump would nominate."

Democrats made a pronounced effort to showcase their diversity, salting the lineup from the stage with black, Hispanic, gay and disabled speakers in an obvious counterpoint to Trump and the various groups he has upset with his remarks.

The convention opened in a dustup over leaked emails showing the party's pro-Clinton, anti-Sanders slant during the primaries, when it was supposed to be neutral. In the uproar, party chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida went swiftly into exile, first giving up her position, then the convention's opening-day gavel after being roundly booed by Sanders partisans at a meeting of her home-state delegation.

Sanders delegate Gian Carlo Espinosa, 29, of Key West, Florida, said he would not abandon protests, as Sanders urged. "Why else are we here?" he asked. "The people that we're representing are displeasured with the party. We have to get that across somehow." This, despite Sanders telling his backers in an email and text message: "Our credibility as a movement will be damaged by booing, turning of backs, walking out or other similar displays."

In roasting heat, spirited protests unfolded outside, another echo of the Republican convention in Cleveland. Several hundred Sanders backers marched down Philadelphia streets, with signs saying "Never Hillary." One said, "Just go to jail, Hillary," a takeoff on cries at the Republican convention to "lock her up."

Nevertheless, Clinton was firmly on track to write the next chapter of a story that left off in 2008, when she conceded the Democratic presidential race to Barack Obama in a speech that lamented "we weren't able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time," but added proudly, "it's got about 18 million cracks in it," a tally of her primary votes.

The roll call, when each state announces its delegate totals from the primary season, will affirm a nomination Clinton locked up weeks ago. One question of the day was whether Sanders would press for a count by all the states, as his delegates want, or interrupt the process to ask that her nomination be approved by acclamation. That's what Clinton did on Obama's behalf in 2008 to indicate their rivalry was truly over.

Clinton promised an uplifting counterpoint to Trump's dark portrayal of the state of the nation, but the fallout from some 19,000 leaked Democratic National Committee emails threatened to complicate those plans.

Michael Buratowski, an analyst with the cybersecurity firm the Democrats employed, said he found evidence of Russian involvement, such as the use of a Russian-language keyboard and time-offs that coincided with Russian business hours in what he described as an attack too sophisticated to be the work of freelance hackers. The hackers took at least a year's worth of detailed chats, emails and research on Trump, according to a person knowledgeable of the breach who wasn't authorized to speak publicly about the matter.

As the convention began, the DNC released a statement apologizing to Sanders and his supporters "for the inexcusable remarks made over email."

The statement was signed by DNC leaders, though Wasserman Schultz's name was notably absent.

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Letter foretold Japan rampage that killed 19 disabled people http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ0113/160729689 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160726/GZ0113/160729689 Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:21:14 -0400 By MARI YAMAGUCHI and YURI KAGEYAMA The Associated Press By By MARI YAMAGUCHI and YURI KAGEYAMA The Associated Press SAGAMIHARA, Japan (AP) - A young Japanese man went on a stabbing rampage Tuesday at a facility for the mentally disabled where he had been fired, officials said, killing 19 people months after he gave a letter to Parliament outlining the bloody plan and saying all disabled people should be put to death.

When he was done, Kanagawa prefectural authorities said, 26-year-old Satoshi Uematsu had left dead or injured nearly a third of the almost 150 patients at the facility in a matter of 40 minutes in the early Tuesday attack. It is Japan's deadliest mass killing in decades. The fire department said 25 were wounded, 20 of them seriously.

Security camera footage played on TV news programs showed a man driving up in a black car and carrying several knives to the Tsukui Yamayuri-en facility in Sagamihara, 50 kilometers (30 miles) west of Tokyo. The man broke in by shattering a window at 2:10 a.m., according to a prefectural health official, and then set about slashing the patients' throats.

Sagamihara fire department official Kunio Takano said the attacker killed 10 women and nine men. The youngest was 19, the oldest 70.

Details of the attack, including whether the victims were asleep or otherwise helpless, were not immediately known. Kanagawa prefecture welfare division official Tatsuhisa Hirosue said many details weren't clear because those who might know were still being questioned by police.

The suspect calmly turned himself in about two hours after the attack, police said.

Uematsu had worked at Tsukui Yamayuri-en, which means mountain lily garden, from 2012 until February, when he was let go. He knew the staffing would be down to just a handful in the wee hours of the morning, Japanese media reports said.

Not much is known yet about his background, but Uematsu once dreamed of becoming a teacher. In two group photos posted on his Facebook, he looks happy, smiling widely with other young men.

"It was so much fun today. Thank you, all. Now I am 23, but please be friends forever," a 2013 post says.

But somewhere along the way, things went terribly awry.

In February, Uematsu tried to hand deliver a letter to Parliament's lower house speaker that revealed his dark turmoil. It demanded that all disabled people be put to death through "a world that allows for mercy killing," Kyodo news agency and TBS TV reported. The Parliament office also confirmed the letter.

Uematsu boasted in the letter that he had the ability to kill 470 disabled people in what he called was "a revolution," and outlined an attack on two facilities, after which he said he will turn himself in. He also asked he be judged innocent on grounds of insanity, be given 500 million yen ($5 million) in aid and plastic surgery so he could lead a normal life afterward.

"My reasoning is that I may be able to revitalize the world economy and I thought it may be possible to prevent World War III," the letter says.

The letter was delivered before Uematsu's last day of work at the facility, but it was unclear whether the letter played a role in his firing, or even if his superiors had known about it.

The letter included Uematsu's name, address and telephone number, and reports of his threats were relayed to local police where Uematsu lived, Kyodo said.

Kanagawa Gov. Yuji Kuroiwa apologized for having failed to act on the warning signs.

Some people in the area said they were shocked that Uematsu is accused, and described him as polite and upstanding.

Akihiro Hasegawa, who lived next door to Uematsu, said he heard Uematsu had gotten in trouble with the facility, initially over sporting a tattoo, often frowned upon in mainstream Japanese society because of its association with criminal groups.

"He was just an ordinary young fellow," he said.

Yasuyuki Deguchi, a criminologist, said Uematsu's alleged actions were typical of someone who bears a grudge and seeks revenge, because it appeared he planned out the attack, and then he turned himself in to police.

"Accomplishing his goal was all he wanted," Deguchi said on TV Asahi.

Michael Gillan Peckitt, a lecturer in clinical philosophy at Osaka University in central Japan, and an expert on disabled people's issues in Japan, said the attack speaks more about Uematsu than the treatment of the disabled in Japan.

"It highlights the need for an early-intervention system in the Japanese mental health system. Someone doesn't get to that state without some symptoms of mental illness," he said.

Mass killings are rare in Japan. Because of the country's extremely strict gun-control laws, any attacker usually resorts to stabbings. In 2008, seven people were killed by a man who slammed a truck into a crowd of people in central Tokyo's Akihabara electronics district and then stabbed passers-by.

In 2001, a man killed eight children and injured 13 others in a knife attack at an elementary school in the city of Osaka. The incident shocked Japan and led to increased security at schools.

This month, a man stabbed four people at a library in northeastern Japan, allegedly over their improper handling of his questions. No one was killed.

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After party turmoil, Bernie Sanders, Michelle Obama thrill convention http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160725/GZ0113/160729694 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160725/GZ0113/160729694 Mon, 25 Jul 2016 23:40:42 -0400 By Julie Pace and Ken Thomas The Associated Press By By Julie Pace and Ken Thomas The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Seeking to bridge deep Democratic divides, Bernie Sanders robustly embraced his former rival Hillary Clinton Monday night as a champion for the same economic causes that enlivened his supporters, signaling it was time for them, too, to rally behind her in the campaign against Republican Donald Trump.

"Any objective observer will conclude that - based on her ideas and her leadership - Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States," he declared in a headlining address on the opening night of the Democratic convention.

Sanders joined a high-wattage lineup of speakers, including first lady Michelle Obama who made a forceful, impassioned case for the Democratic nominee. Mrs. Obama's address all but wiped away earlier tumult in the convention hall that had exposed lingering tensions between Clinton and Sanders supporters.

Mrs. Obama, who has spent nearly eight years in the White House avoiding political fights, took numerous swipes at Trump, all while avoiding mentioning him by name.

"This election and every election is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives," she said. "There is only one person I trust with that responsibility, only one person I believe is truly qualified to be president of the United States, and that is Hillary Clinton."

While Sanders had endorsed Clinton previously, his remarks Monday marked his most vigorous and detailed praise of her qualifications for the presidency. It came at a crucial moment for Clinton's campaign, on the heels of leaked emails suggesting the party had favored the former secretary of state through the primaries despite a vow of neutrality.

Sanders scored the resignation of party chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a nemesis in the primaries, but that wasn't enough to quell the anger of supporters. As the convention opened, they still erupted in chants of "Bernie" and booed Clinton the first several times her name was mentioned. Outside the convention hall, several hundred marched down Philadelphia's sweltering streets with signs carrying messages such as "Never Hillary."

Behind the scenes, Sanders and Clinton aides joined forces to try to ease tensions. Clinton's campaign quickly added more Sanders' supporters to the speakers lineup. Sanders sent urgent messages to supporters asking them not to protest.

By the time Sanders took the stage for the night's closing address, much of the anger had been overshadowed by speeches promoting party unity. Sanders did his part, imploring his supporters to consider a country under Trump's leadership.

"If you don't believe this election is important, if you think you can sit it out, take a moment to think about the Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump would nominate and what that would mean to civil liberties, equal rights and the future of our country," he said.

President Bill Clinton, watching from the audience, leapt to his feet and applauded, as did most of the delegates filling the convention arena.

Sanders spoke just after Massachusetts. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of liberals who has emerged as one of the Democrats' toughest critics of Trump.

"Donald Trump has no real plans for jobs, for college kids, for seniors," she said in the keynote address. "No plans to make anything great for anyone except rich guys like Donald Trump."

Mrs. Obama was one of the night's standouts. While she has often avoided overt politics during her nearly eight years in the White House, her frustration with Trump's rise was evident. She warned that the White House couldn't be in the hands of someone with "a thin skin or a tendency to lash out" or someone who tells voters the country can be great again.

"This right now, is the greatest country on earth," she said.

Clinton's campaign hoped the nighttime line-up would overshadow a tumultuous start to the four-day convention. The hacked DNC emails fed the suspicion of Sanders' supporters and sapped Clinton's campaign of some of its energy following a well-received rollout Saturday of her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine.

Campaigning in North Carolina, Trump seemed to revel in the Democrats' commotion, telling supporters that Clinton made a mistake by not choosing a more liberal running mate to appease Sanders' base. "Crazy Bernie's going crazy right now," he said.

But in Philadelphia, Delegates waved "Love Trumps Hate" signs and cheered as immigration supporters, gay rights advocates, and labor leaders took the stage.

Comedian-turned-Sen. Al Franken, a Clinton supporter, and actress Sarah Silverman, a Sanders supporter, made a joint appearance to promote party unity.

"I am proud to be part of Bernie's movement," Silverman said as the crowd roared. "And a vital part of that movement is making absolutely sure Hillary Clinton is our next president of the United States."

Trump was a frequent target throughout the night, though the jabs were often more mocking than mean. The tone was a sharp contrast to the Republican convention, where the attacks against Clinton was bitingly personal, including chants of "Lock her up."

Wasserman Schultz had planned to be among those taking the stage, despite the email hacking controversy. But she stepped aside, bowing to pressure from Democrats who feared the mere sight of her on stage would prompt strong opposition.

The outgoing chairwoman did watch the gathering from a private suite at the arena.

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2 killed, at least 17 wounded in Florida nightclub shooting http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160725/GZ0113/160729731 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160725/GZ0113/160729731 Mon, 25 Jul 2016 06:15:20 -0400 By TERRY SPENCER The Associated Press By By TERRY SPENCER The Associated Press FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) - A shooting at a Florida nightclub early Monday morning killed two people and wounded at least 17, police said. The attack apparently occurred at a teen party, billed as a "Swimsuit Glow Party," at Club Blu in Fort Myers, according to local media.

Police detained three people and said the area around the club had been deemed safe, police Capt. Jim Mulligan said in a statement.

It was not immediately clear what triggered the violence.

Three people remained hospitalized Monday morning, Cherly Garn, a spokeswoman for Lee Memorial Health System, said in an e-mail. All others were treated and released. Two people brought to two other area hospitals were also treated and released, Garn said.

Ages of the patients ranged from 12 to 27, Garn said.

The club is in a strip mall that includes a daycare center and is across the street from a large apartment complex. Officers had the area taped off as crime scene technicians scoured the strip mall parking lot for clues.

The shooting comes more than a month after a nightclub shooting in Orlando that was the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history. The shooting at the Pulse nightclub on June 12 left 49 victims dead and 53 others wounded.

The violence at Club Blu erupted about 12:30 a.m. Monday, Mulligan said. There were two active crime scenes, police said. Several hours later a street in the area remained closed as police investigated.

In a statement, authorities said the Fort Myers police and the Lee County Sheriff's Office were "actively canvassing the area looking for other persons who may be involved in this incident."

The names of the victims were not immediately available.

Syreeta Gary told WFTX-TV her daughter ran and dodged between shots to avoid being shot. Her daughter was OK, but her daughter's friend "got hit in the leg and luckily it's just her leg," she said.

"Her dodging bullets and running, dropping in between cars, it's ridiculous that these kids have to go through this," Gary said. "They can't enjoy themselves because you have other people that have criminalistic minds and they just want to terrorize things."

A post on Club Blu's Facebook page Monday morning said the shooting happened as the club was closing and parents were picking up their children. The post also said there was armed security at the event.

"We are deeply sorry for all involved," the post read. "We tried to give teens what we thought was a safe place to have a good time."

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DNC starts in Philadelphia with huge protests, high temps http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160725/GZ0113/160729732 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160725/GZ0113/160729732 Mon, 25 Jul 2016 06:09:48 -0400 By GEOFF MULVIHILL and MEGAN TRIMBLE The Associated Press By By GEOFF MULVIHILL and MEGAN TRIMBLE The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) - The Democratic National Convention gets underway Monday in Philadelphia with much bigger demonstrations than the Republican convention and much higher temperatures as the region copes with an oppressive heat wave.

In one of the largest rallies planned for the day, a pro-Bernie Sanders group is expected to walk across the Ben Franklin Bridge, which connects Camden, New Jersey, with Philadelphia.

The demonstrations, largely driven by Sanders supporters, have been peaceful so far.

On Sunday, throngs of people marched along a main thoroughfare of the city to show their support for Sanders and their disdain for presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

They chanted "Hell no, DNC, we won't vote for Hillary" and "This is what democracy looks like."

Although planned for months, the marches came as fractures appeared in the party that had been trying to display a show of unity in recent weeks. Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned Sunday as Democratic Party chairwoman over emails suggesting the DNC had played favorites for Clinton during the primary.

The Democrats had been trying to avoid the divide that was apparent in Cleveland during the Republican National Convention last week. But the hacked emails, published by WikiLeaks, further fired up Sanders supporters, who long accused the party of favoring Clinton despite officially being neutral.

Sanders had called for Wasserman Schultz's resignation and said Sunday that she made the right decision for the party's future by resigning.

Darcy Samek, 54, traveled alone from Minneapolis to protest through the four-day convention. She said Wasserman Schultz has been a "miserable failure" who needed to be gone.

"Everyone kind of knew (the Democratic Party was against Bernie Sanders), but that doesn't mean it will change now that it's proven. It's just more of the same," she said.

Philadelphia police called Sunday's protests peaceful and said they were pleased with how things were going.

Earlier in the day, thousands of clean-energy activists jammed a downtown street in their milelong march from City Hall to Independence Hall, near the Liberty Bell. They held anti-fracking and anti-pipeline signs, some with illustrations showing a train surrounded by a fireball and the words "No Exploding Trains." Others held "Bernie or Bust" signs.

Sam Miller, 82, traveled from Erie, Pennsylvania, to join the march that stretched several blocks and across a wide street as temperatures in the city soared into the mid-90s. He said he was inspired because "fracking is invading Mother Earth."

The heat wave is not going away anytime soon. It will hit a peak Monday with temperatures in the city possibly reaching 100 degrees but feeling like 108, according to the National Weather Service.

Officials said volunteers will be handing out water to demonstrators all week.

Some of the largest protests will start about 4 miles north of the Wells Fargo Center in south Philadelphia, where the convention is being held. Most protests during the RNC were concentrated in a tight, 1.7-square-mile zone downtown. A heavy police presence and fewer than expected protesters helped keep the calm. About two dozen arrests were made, and there were no significant injuries.

More than 5,000 delegates are among the 50,000 people set to attend the four-day convention, which is expected to culminate with Clinton being named the party's official nominee for president.

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Democratic chair resigning after hacked emails suggested favoritism http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160724/GZ0113/160729762 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160724/GZ0113/160729762 Sun, 24 Jul 2016 16:25:28 -0400 By Anne Flaherty and Julie Pace The Associated Press By By Anne Flaherty and Julie Pace The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Debbie Wasserman Schultz is resigning under pressure as Democratic Party chairwoman, a stunning leadership shakeup as party officials gather in Philadelphia to nominate Hillary Clinton.

Wasserman Schultz's announcement Sunday follows a firestorm over hacked emails suggesting the Democratic National Committee favored Clinton during the primary, despite pledging neutrality. The leaked emails prompted primary runner-up Bernie Sanders to call for Wasserman Schultz's immediate resignation.

In a statement, Wasserman Schultz said she will step down at the end of the four-day convention. She said she plans to formally open and close the convention, as well as address delegates.

Her statement does not address the email controversy.

Wasserman Schultz's swift ouster underscores party leaders' desire to avoid convention confrontations with Sanders' loyal supporters. The chairwoman has been a lightning rod for criticism throughout the presidential campaign, with Sanders repeatedly accusing the DNC of backing Clinton.

Sanders said the 19,000 emails published by the website Wikileaks appeared to confirm his suspicions.

In one leaked email, a DNC official wondered whether Sanders' religious beliefs could be used against him, questioning whether the candidate may be an atheist.

Sanders pressed for Wasserman Schultz to quit as chairwoman immediately. He also suggested that Clinton's choice of running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, was a disappointment and that he would have preferred Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a favorite of liberals.

"His political views are not my political views. He is more conservative than I am. Would I have preferred to see somebody like an Elizabeth Warren selected by Secretary Clinton? Yes, I would have," Sanders told NBC's "Meet the Press."

The Clinton team worked to portray their party's convention in a different light from the just concluded Republican gathering in Cleveland, where Donald Trump accepted the GOP nomination but party divisions flared when his chief rival, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, refused to endorse the billionaire businessman.

Trump cast himself as the law-and-order candidate in a nation suffering under crime and hobbled by immigration, as the GOP convention stuck to a gloom-and-doom theme. Democrats said they wanted to convey a message of optimism and improving the lives of all Americans.

But party disunity also seems to be a factor in Philadelphia, given Sanders' demands for a new leader and general unhappiness among his many supporters about how the nomination process unfolded.

Norman Solomon, a delegate who supports Bernie Sanders, says there is talk among Sanders' delegates of walking out during Kaine's acceptance speech or turning their backs as a show of protest.

Solomon said he believes a "vast majority" of Sanders delegates support these kinds of protests to express their dismay. Sanders' supporters say they are concerned that Kaine is not progressive enough.

Dan O'Neal, 68, is a retired school teacher and delegate from Arizona, said Wasserman Schultz has to be censured.

"We knew they were stacking the deck against Bernie from the get-go, but this type of stuff coming out is outrageous," he said. "It proves our point that they've tried to marginalize him and make it as difficult as possible."

Trump's campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, agreed, saying Sanders' supporters "have a lot to complain about."

"The emails have proven the system was rigged from the start," Manafort told "Fox News Sunday."

Clinton's campaign manager, Robby Mook, tried to shift blame away from DNC officials to "Russian state actors" who, he said, may have hacked into DNC computers "for the purpose of helping Donald Trump," the Republican presidential nominee.

How the emails were stolen hasn't been confirmed.

"It was concerning last week that Donald Trump changed the Republican platform to become what some experts would regard as pro-Russian," Mook said.

Clinton is within just days of her long-held ambition to become the party's official presidential nominee.

After the DNC released a slightly trimmed list of superdelegates - those are the party officials who can back any candidate - it now takes 2,382 delegates to formally clinch the nomination. Clinton has 2,814 when including superdelegates, according to an Associated Press count. Sanders has 1,893.

Sanders has endorsed Clinton, but his delegates are pushing for a state-by-state tally. The state-by-state roll call is scheduled for Tuesday.

Also Sunday, Kaine and his wife, Anne Holton, were back at their longtime church in Richmond, Virginia, a day after he made his campaign debut with Clinton.

Kaine, a former choir member at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church, sang a solo during Communion. He later told reporters outside the church: "We needed some prayers today and we got some prayers, and we got some support and it really feels good."

Associated Press writers Chad Day and Hope Yen in Washington, Alan Suderman in Richmond, Virginia, and Alex Sanz in Philadelphia contributed to this report.

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IOC: 45 more positive cases of doping in retests of 2008, '12 samples http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160722/GZ0113/160729851 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160722/GZ0113/160729851 Fri, 22 Jul 2016 08:34:45 -0400 By STEPHEN WILSON The Associated Press By By STEPHEN WILSON The Associated Press LONDON (AP) - Forty-five more athletes, including 23 medalists from the 2008 Beijing Games, have been caught for doping after retesting of samples from the last two Olympics, the IOC said Friday.

The new cases bring to 98 the total number of athletes who have failed tests so far in the reanalysis of their stored samples from Beijing and the 2012 Olympics in London.

Using "the very latest scientific analysis methods," the latest round of retests produced 30 "provisional" positive findings from Beijing and 15 confirmed positives from London, the IOC reported.

No names were given.

The International Olympic Committee stores doping samples for 10 years so they can be retested when new methods become available, meaning drug cheats who escaped detection at the time can be caught years later.

The retesting program has targeted athletes who were in contention to compete at the upcoming Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, but has also been widened to cover many medalists.

"All athletes found to have infringed the anti-doping rules will be banned from competing" at the Rio Games, the IOC said.

The announcement comes at a time when the IOC is weighing whether to ban Russia from the Rio Olympics over allegations of systematic and state-run doping.

On Thursday, the Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld an IAAF ban on Russia's track and field athletes from the games. The IOC executive board is scheduled to hold a meeting Sunday amid calls by anti-doping bodies to exclude Russia entirely from Rio.

The IOC said the previous first wave of retests had found 30 positive cases from Beijing and 23 from London. The Russian Olympic Committee has said 22 of those cases involved Russian athletes, including medalists.

A total of 1,243 samples have been retested so far in the first two waves of the reanalysis program.

The 30 new positive cases from Beijing involved athletes from four sports and eight countries.

The 15 athletes caught in the new London tests represent two sports and nine countries. The IOC did not say whether any were medalists.

A third and fourth round of retesting will continue throughout and after the Rio Games, the IOC said.

"The new reanalysis once again shows the commitment of the IOC in the fight against doping," IOC President Thomas Bach said in a statement.

The IOC said it was informing the national Olympic committees and international sports federations affected by the latest positives, clearing the way for disciplinary proceedings to begin against the athletes.

The IOC said it could not provide more details, including the names of the athletes, "for legal reasons."

"This will follow in due course," it said.

So far, only one athlete has been formally disqualified by the IOC in the retesting program.

Last week, Ukrainian weightlifter Yulia Kalina was stripped of her bronze medal from the London Olympics after her sample came back positive for the steroid turinabol.

The IOC reported in May that it had found 31 positives from Beijing. It said Friday that the backup "B" samples in two cases did not confirm the original finding, while an additional positive case was confirmed later.

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Making GOP history, Trump vows to protect LGBTQ community http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160722/GZ0113/160729852 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160722/GZ0113/160729852 Fri, 22 Jul 2016 06:31:51 -0400 By JOSH LEDERMAN The Associated Press By By JOSH LEDERMAN The Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) - With five letters, Donald Trump brushed off decades of Republican reluctance to voice full-throated support for gay rights - at least for a night.

Trump's call in his speech to the Republican National Convention for protecting the "LGBTQ community" was a watershed moment for the Republican Party - the first time the issue has been elevated in a GOP nomination address. Four years ago, Mitt Romney never uttered the word "gay," much less the full acronym - standing for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning.

But Trump, as if to drive the point home, said it not once, but twice.

"I will do everything in my power to protect our LGBTQ citizens from the violence and oppression of a hateful foreign ideology," Trump said, adding for emphasis: "Believe me."

If Republican delegates gathered in Cleveland to nominate Trump were caught off-guard, they didn't show it. They cheered him - loudly.

Even the candidate seemed surprised.

"I have to say, as a Republican it is so nice to hear you cheering for what I just said," Trump ad-libbed. "Thank you."

The unequivocal appeal for a more inclusive tone is likely to give Trump's fellow Republicans permission to embrace an issue resonating deeply with a younger generation of voters from all sides of the political spectrum. It also puts Trump squarely at odds with the party platform adopted just three days earlier at his own nominating convention.

In fact, the GOP platform moves farther away from gay rights than past years, with a new admonition of gay parenting that says kids raised by a mother and father tend to be "physically and emotionally healthier." Preserved in the platform are opposition to gay marriage and to bathroom choice for transgender people.

To be sure, Trump is far from the candidate that gay rights advocates would have selected were the choice up to them. Unlike Hillary Clinton, who supports same-sex marriage, Trump has said he'd nominate Supreme Court justices who might overturn the ruling legalizing it nationwide. He once called that ruling "shocking" and has said states should get to decide - a position in line with mainstream Republican orthodoxy.

Yet the New York billionaire has often spoken effusively about his friendships with gay people while avoiding anti-gay rhetoric that many other GOP candidates have embraced. After a gunman claiming Islamic State allegiance killed 49 people at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, Trump said he'd be better than Clinton because he wouldn't allow in Muslim immigrants who want to "murder gays."

In another Republican first, an openly gay speaker acknowledged his sexuality Thursday from the podium - and put fellow Republicans on the spot by saying he disagreed with parts of the platform. Peter Thiel, the co-founder of PayPal, said only Trump was being honest about how "fake culture wars" distract from America's economic decline.

"I am proud to be gay," Thiel declared. "I am proud to be a Republican. But most of all, I am proud to be an American."

He was greeted with wild cheers and extended applause as some delegations jumped to their feet - another striking moment for a Republican gathering.

Throughout this week's convention, pro-gay Republicans hailing Trump as the most supportive nominee in the party's history have had their elation tempered by the stark realization that their party is still pushing a very different message. Cara Pavalock, a Connecticut state lawmaker attending the convention, said that's a reflection of how much work the party needs to do on the issue.

"I joined the party not for what it is but for what I know it will be in the future," said Pavalock, a Trump supporter.

And the closing-night moments aside, Trump's nominating convention featured awkward silences on the rare occasions when gay rights came up. The final evening featured speeches by Family Research Council President Tony Perkins and evangelical leader Jerry Falwell Jr., two vehement gay rights opponents.

For those hoping Trump's nomination will improve the party's reputation among gay rights proponents, there's another challenge: Mainstream gay rights groups have denounced Trump, arguing that tolerance for one minority group doesn't excuse prejudice toward others - like Hispanics and Muslims - or unflattering comments about women.

"His hatred toward anybody is a huge concern," said Jay Brown of the Human Rights Campaign. "When he attacks women, he attacks us. When he attacks Muslims, he's attacking us."

Gay Republicans say that's an attempt by left-leaning groups to blur the issues to help Democrats win elections and raise money.

"They are hell-bent on keeping this a political issue," said Republican strategist Richard Grenell.

Four years ago Grenell, who is gay, was hired by 2012 Republican nominee Mitt Romney to be his foreign policy spokesman, but resigned under pressure from social conservatives who questioned Romney's conservatism. This week, he attended a "Big Tent Brunch" on the convention's sidelines hosted by a pro-LGBT nonprofit.

At the brunch - held in a literal big tent at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, pro-LGBT Republicans sipped mimosas and mingled with transgender activist Caitlyn Jenner while a man carried a rainbow version of the Gadsden flag - a tea party symbol. Added was the phrase "Shoot Back," employed by gun rights advocates after the Orlando shooting to suggest the victims should have been armed.

Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP

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Trump pledges better times for US in convention finale http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160722/GZ0113/160729853 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160722/GZ0113/160729853 Fri, 22 Jul 2016 06:17:35 -0400 By Julie Pace and Robert Furlow The Associated Press By By Julie Pace and Robert Furlow The Associated Press CLEVELAND - Declaring America in crisis, Donald Trump pledged to cheering Republicans and still-skeptical voters Thursday night that as president he will restore the safety they fear they're losing, strictly curb immigration and save the nation from a Hillary Clinton record of "death, destruction, terrorism and weakness."

Confidently addressing the finale of his party's less-than-smooth national convention, the billionaire businessman declared the nation's problems too staggering to be fixed within the confines of traditional politics.

A political novice, he completed the greatest step yet in his improbable rise, accepting the GOP nomination to face Clinton, the former first lady, senator and secretary of state.

Trump's address on the closing night of the Republican convention marked his highest-profile opportunity yet to show voters he's prepared for the presidency. He set aside much of his usual bravado.

As the crowd, fiercely opposed to Clinton, broke out in its oft-used chant of, "Lock her up," he waved them off, and instead declared, "Let's defeat her in November."

He offered himself as a powerful ally of those who feel Washington has left them behind.

"I'm with you, and I will fight for you, and I will win for you," he declared. "I have joined the political arena so that the powerful can no longer beat up on people that cannot defend themselves."

He accused Clinton, his far-more-experienced Democratic rival, of utterly lacking the good judgment to serve in the White House and as the military's commander in chief.

"This is the legacy of Hillary Clinton: death, destruction and weakness," he said. "But Hillary Clinton's legacy does not have to be America's legacy."

In a direct appeal to Americans shaken by a summer of violence at home and around the world, Trump promised that if he takes office in January, "safety will be restored."

As Trump moved into the general election campaign, he stuck to the controversial proposals of his primary campaign, including building a wall along the entire U.S.-Mexico border and suspending immigration from nations "compromised by terrorism."

But in a nod to a broader swath of Americans, he vowed to protect gays and lesbians from violence and oppression, and said he would ensure that young people in predominantly black cities "have as much of a right to live out their dreams as any other child in America."

He was introduced by his daughter Ivanka who announced a childcare policy proposal that the campaign had not mentioned before.

"As president, my father will change the labor laws that were put in place at a time when women weren't a significant portion of the workplace, and he will focus on making quality childcare affordable and accessible for all," she said.

Trump took the stage in Cleveland facing a daunting array of challenges, many of his own making. Though he vanquished 16 primary rivals, he's viewed with unprecedented negativity by the broader electorate, and is struggling in particular with younger voters and minorities, groups GOP leaders know they need for the party to grow.

The first three days of this week's convention e gathering bordered on chaos, starting with a plagiarism charge involving his wife Melania Trump's speech and moving on to Texas Sen. Ted Cruz's dramatic refusal to endorse him from the convention stage.

Then, Trump sparked more questions about his Oval Office readiness by suggesting in the midst of the convention that the U.S. might not defend America's NATO partners with him as president. The remarks, in an interview published online Wednesday by The New York Times, deviate from decades of American doctrine and seem to reject the 67-year-old alliance's bedrock principle of collective defense.

Trump did not repeat those comments from the convention stage. But he did disavow America's foreign policy posture under both Democrat and Republican presidents, criticizing "fifteen years of wars in the Middle East" and declaring that "Americanism, not globalism, will be our credo."

"As long as we are led by politicians who will not put 'America First,' then we can be assured that other nations will not treat America with respect," he said.

He had promised to describe "major, major" tax cuts. But his economic proposals Thursday night were vague, centering on unspecified plans to create millions of jobs. He promised a "simplified" tax system for the middle class and businesses, fewer regulations and renegotiation of trade deals that he says have put working class Americans at a disadvantage.

"These are the forgotten men and women of our country," he said. "People who work hard but no longer have a voice."

At every turn, Trump drew sharp contrasts with Clinton, casting her as both unqualified for the presidency and too tied to Washington elites to understand voters' struggles. Her greatest accomplishment, Trump said, was avoiding punishment from the FBI for her use of a private email and personal server while as secretary of state.

Indeed, Clinton was aggressively attacked throughout the four-day Republican convention, with delegates repeatedly chanting, "Lock her up."

Democrats will formally nominate Clinton at their convention next week in Philadelphia. Clinton was on the verge of naming a running mate to join her in taking on Trump and his vice presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, in the general election. Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine has emerged as her top choice.

AP writers Kathleen Hennessey, Josh Lederman, Alan Fram and Thomas Beaumont in Cleveland, and John Hanna in Topeka, Kansas, contributed to this report.

Follow Julie Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC

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Anti-Trump march kicks off final day of GOP convention http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729899 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729899 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 15:17:01 -0400 By MICHAEL R. SISAK and MICHAEL HILL The Associated Press By By MICHAEL R. SISAK and MICHAEL HILL The Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) - About 150 protesters carrying signs saying "Ban All Trumps Not Muslims" and chanting "Love Trumps Hate" marched across a Cleveland bridge Thursday afternoon as the four-day GOP convention neared its prime-time finale.

The protest by a group called Stand Together Against Trump drew little notice outside a heavy police presence. Officers on rooftops watched through binoculars, while police on bicycles pedaled along the streets with no other traffic.

The anti-Donald Trump forces scheduled an evening rally in downtown's Public Square that was expected to draw a bigger crowd. Trump was set to accept his party's nomination Thursday night.

The demonstrators, in sweltering heat pushing above 90 degrees, dutifully followed the city's designated route for protest marches.

"Trump is trying to use the moment to divide us. He's trying to use the moment to gain personal power," said march organizer Bryan Hambley, a Cleveland doctor.

Officers got between the marchers and a few conservative religious counter-protesters to make sure no skirmishes broke out.

The 23 protest-related arrests reported since Monday were well below what law enforcement officials had feared. Seventeen of the arrests came Wednesday, during a melee that erupted during a flag-burning outside an entrance to the convention arena.

Organizers of that event denied on Thursday that the man holding the American flag was on fire and said police used that as an excuse to move in.

Two officers were assaulted and suffered minor injuries, police said. The charges against those arrested included failure to disperse, resisting arrest and felonious assault on a police officer.

That included a disorderly conduct charge against Gregory "Joey" Johnson, whose torching of a flag at a GOP convention three decades ago led to the landmark 1989 U.S. Supreme Court decision that said flag-burning is protected by the First Amendment.

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Florida police shoot black man with his hands up as he tries to help autistic patient http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729909 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729909 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 14:41:47 -0400 By Michael E. Miller and Mark Berman Washington Post By By Michael E. Miller and Mark Berman Washington Post Police in South Florida shot an unarmed black caretaker Monday as he tried to help his autistic patient.

Charles Kinsey was trying to retrieve a young autistic man who had wandered away from an assisted living facility and was blocking traffic when Kinsey was shot by a North Miami police officer.

The North Miami Police Department said that they were responding to a call about an armed man threatening suicide, but they have released few other details about the shooting itself.

In cellphone footage of the incident that emerged Wednesday, Kinsey can be seen lying on the ground with his hands in the air, trying to calm the autistic man and defuse the situation seconds before he is shot.

"All he has is a toy truck in his hand," Kinsey can be heard saying in the video as police officers with assault rifles hide behind telephone poles approximately 30 feet away.

"That's all it is," the caretaker says. "There is no need for guns."

Seconds later, off camera, one of the officers fired his weapon three times.

A bullet tore through Kinsey's right leg.

Kinsey said he was stunned by the shooting.

"I was thinking as long as I have my hands up ... they're not going to shoot me," he told local television station WSVN from his hospital bed.

"Wow, was I wrong."

Kinsey said he was even more stunned by what happened afterward, when police handcuffed him and left him bleeding on the pavement for "about 20 minutes."

His attorney called the video "shocking."

"There is no reason to fire your weapon at a man who has his hands up and is trying to help," Hilton Napoleon told The Washington Post in a telephone interview Wednesday night.

Napoleon called for the department to fire the officer.

North Miami is a city of about 62,000 people that sits on Biscayne Bay, tucked between the much larger cities of Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

Gary Eugene, the city's police chief, was appointed to the position just a month before the shooting. He had joined the department in 2013 following his retirement from the Miami police force, where he spent nearly three decades.

"I realize there are many questions about what happened Monday night," Eugene said during a news conference Thursday. "We all have questions ... I assure you, we'll get all the answers."

Eugene said he had asked the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) to investigate the shooting, and a spokeswoman for that agency confirmed Thursday morning that it had launched an investigation.

"Bringing in an outside agency shows our commitment to transparency and objectivity in a very sensitive matter," Eugene said.

In a statement, Katherine Fernandez Rundle, the state attorney for Miami-Date County, said her office would conduct its own investigation after the state probe is completed, and would "review all of the evidence to determine whether the actions of the shooting officer constitute a criminal act."

Eugene and the North Miami police did not release the name of the officer involved, referring questions instead to the state agency, which said it would not name the officer.

The police department has released relatively few details about the shooting, which drew widespread attention days after it occurred when video of the episode began to spread online.

During his briefing Thursday, Eugene said that police received a 911 call Monday just after 5 p.m. about "a male with a gun threatening to commit suicide." There were witnesses that also reported a gun, Eugene said.

"Our officers responded to the scene with that threat in mind," Eugene said. But he said there were no guns at the scene. "I want to make it clear: There was no gun recovered."

In a statement Tuesday, the police department had offered slightly more about what unfolded: "Arriving officers attempted to negotiate with two men on the scene, one of whom was later identified as suffering from Autism," the statement said. "At some point during the on-scene negotiation, one of the responding officers discharged his weapon, striking the employee of the [assisted living facility]."

Police have not responded respond to multiple requests for comment. According to their statement, the officer involved has been placed on administrative leave, as is standard policy in police-involved shootings.

Authorities have not said why the officer opened fire on an unarmed man with his hands prominently in the air and with another man nearby.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch said the Justice Department was aware of the North Miami shooting, but she said federal officials do not know enough yet to know if they will review it.

"I'm aware of the incident, and we're working with our partners in the area to gather more information about it," Lynch said during a news conference Thursday. "We're trying to gather all the facts about it so we can determine, essentially, how that matter will be handled or reviewed."

This latest shooting comes at a tense time for police and civilians, after a remarkably fraught period that saw high-profile shootings of and by police officers.

Police across the country are on alert after gunmen ambushed officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge just days apart, killing eight officers. At the same time, police are under scrutiny after the fatal shootings of two black men earlier this month. Bystanders filmed Baton Rouge police fatally shooting Alton Sterling in the early hours of July 5. Less than 48 hours later, Philando Castile was fatally shot by an officer in Falcon Heights, Minn. His girlfriend streamed the aftermath on Facebook Live.

Like those two incidents, the Monday afternoon altercation was partially captured on camera.

"He was lying on the ground, with his hands up, freezing, being rational, and he was still shot," Rep. Frederica S. Wilson, D-Fla., who represents part of Miami-Dade County, said at the news conference Thursday.

"This is not supposed to be happening in North Miami," she said. "North Miami is a city where the police officers and the community gel. So many of our police officers come from the community, live in the community, work with the community."

Before the recording began Monday, the young autistic man had apparently wandered away from a North Miami assisted living facility. A manager at the facility told WSVN that the man was "about 23 years old, he's autistic, he's nonverbal [and] he's relatively low-functioning."

The autistic man sat on the ground, blocking traffic, while he played with a small white toy truck, Napoleon told The Post.

Kinsey, an employee at the facility, went to retrieve him.

Around the same time, someone in the area called 911 and reported seeing a man with a gun threatening to commit suicide, police said.

According to Napoleon, Kinsey was trying to persuade the autistic man to get out of the street when police approached with their rifles raised.

With the Sterling and Castile shootings on his mind, Kinsey lay down on the ground and put his hands in the air.

"I was really more worried about him than myself," Kinsey told WSVN, referring to the autistic man.

Two bystander videos capture snippets of what happened next.

A video from before the shooting - obtained by Napoleon and shared with The Post - begins with bystanders saying "Look, look, look," in Spanish.

"Mira, mira, mira," a man can be heard saying, training his cellphone camera on Kinsey, who is on the ground with his hands up and trying to get the autistic man to do the same.

"Lay down on your stomach," Kinsey tells the young man.

"Shut up," the autistic man shouts. "Shut up, you idiot."

Kinsey turns his attention to the police.

"Can I get up now?" he asks. "Can I get up?"

As police aim their assault rifles at the men in the street, Kinsey tries to explain to them that they pose no threat.

"All he has is a toy truck in his hand. A toy truck," Kinsey can be heard saying in the video. "I am a behavioral therapist at a group home.

"That's all it is," he says, referring to the toy truck. "That's all it is. There is no need for guns."

"Let me see your hands," a cop can be heard shouting at the autistic man. "Get on the ground. Get on the ground."

The autistic man then begins to make noises, apparently playing with his toy.

"Rinaldo, please be still," Kinsey tells his patient. "Sit down, Rinaldo. Lay on your stomach."

The video then cuts out, leaving a critical gap in the footage.

Seconds later, off camera, one of the officers fired his weapon three times.

One of the bullets struck Kinsey near his right knee, exiting his upper thigh.

"My life flashed in front of me," he told WSVN, adding that his first thought was of his family.

His second thought was one of confusion.

"When he shot me, it was so surprising," he said. "It was like a mosquito bite, and when it hit me, I'm like, I still got my hands in the air, and I said, 'No, I just got shot.' "

"Sir, why did you shoot me?" Kinsey recalled asking the officer.

"He said, 'I don't know.' "

A second video captures the moments after the shooting, as officers placed the injured Kinsey and the autistic man into handcuffs.

"He was like, 'Please don't shoot me,' " a bystander can be heard saying on the video. "Why they shot the black boy and not the fat boy?"

"Because the things with the blacks," another man says.

"I don't know who's guilty," adds what sounds like a woman's voice.

It was the officers' reaction after the shooting that upset Kinsey and Napoleon the most.

"They flipped me over, and I'm face-down in the ground, with cuffs on, waiting on the rescue squad to come," Kinsey told WSVN. "I'd say about 20, about 20 minutes it took the rescue squad to get there. And I was like, bleeding - I mean bleeding and I was like, 'Wow.' "

"Right now, I am just grateful that he is alive, and he is able to tell his story," his wife, Joyce, told the TV station.

Kinsey was "dumbfounded" by the shooting, Napoleon said.

"He should recover physically but he is really kind of mentally distraught," the attorney added. "As you can see in the video, he did everything he thought he had to do and then some ... and still got shot."

Napoleon said his client was on the ground with his hands up, as in the video, when shot.

"Nobody got up or approached" the officers, the attorney said, adding that the fact that the officer fired three times shows it was "not an accident."

"The straw that really breaks the camel's back, that makes it even more frustrating, is that after my client was shot, they handcuffed him and left him on the hot Miami summer pavement for 20 minutes while fire-rescue came and while he was bleeding out," Napoleon said. "But for the grace of God he wouldn't be with us."

"That toy truck does not come close to looking like a gun," he told The Post. "The officers had more than enough time to look and make a determination and not just base it on what they heard on the telephone. They have an obligation to go and look and determine if [reports of an armed man were] right and they had ample opportunity to do so."

Napoleon said he knew better than most the dangers cops endure on a daily basis.

"You're talking to someone whose dad was a police officer in the city of Detroit in the '70s and '80s," he said. "I understand it. I had a fear when I was a child of whether or not my father was going to come home.

"But at the end of the day, we can't use that as an excuse to allow police officers to shoot unarmed individuals," he said. "Just like the police ask the community to not judge them based on ... however many bad apples that are out there. In the same sense, they have to be able to hold themselves to the same standard and not hold the entire [black] community responsible for the incidents that happened in Dallas and Baton Rouge."

Napoleon said he was already in negotiations with the city of North Miami regarding a possible settlement.

"I have confidence that the city is going to negotiate in good faith and try to resolve this issue," he said. "At a minimum, we would request that they terminate the officer immediately based on what's in the video."

The attorney said he trusted the state's attorney's office to determine whether criminal charges should be filed against the officer.

Napoleon said Kinsey, a father of five, is involved in community efforts to keep youths out of trouble and in school.

"He's just a solid guy," he said of his client, who remains hospitalized. "It takes a special individual to work with people with special needs, as this young man did. That shows his character."

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Brazil arrests 10 in alleged Olympics terror plot http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729918 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729918 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 12:00:49 -0400 The Associated Press By The Associated Press RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) - Brazilian police arrested 10 people who allegedly pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group on social media and discussed possible attacks during the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, officials said Thursday.

Justice Minister Alexandre de Moraes said in the capital, Brasilia, that 10 suspects had been detained and two more were being sought. All are Brazilian, and one is a minor. The gender of the people was not given.

Police acted because the group discussed using weapons and guerrilla tactics to potentially launch an attack during the Olympics, which begin Aug. 5, Moraes said.

However "they were complete amateurs and ill-prepared" to actually launch an attack, Moraes said. "A few days ago they said they should start practicing martial arts, for example."

Still, Moraes said even disorganized groups should be taken seriously.

The arrests were made in 10 different states, including Sao Paulo and Parana in the southern part of the country, and it was not clear whether the suspects knew each other beyond their online contacts. Moraes said there were no specific targets for an attack.

Moraes said they had all been "baptized" as Islamic State sympathizers online and none had actually traveled to Syria or Iraq, the group's stronghold, or received any training. Several were allegedly trying to secure financing from the group, known by the acronym ISIS.

The justice minister said one of the suspects communicated with a store in Paraguay via email in an alleged attempt to by an AK-47 assault rifle, apparently the most concrete action taken toward a possible attack. That email communication was intercepted by police.

Brazilians are allowed to possess small firearms but must have a license and training to do so. Only members of the military may possess assault weapons like the AK-47, although those and other firearms are common place especially in slums controlled by drug gangs.

Moraes said authorities seized computers, cellphones and other equipment, but no weapons.

Last week the top military aide for Brazil's interim government said concerns over terrorism had "reached a higher level" after the attack in Nice, France.

Officials did not raise the country's terror alert level Thursday following the raids.

Security has emerged as the top concern during the Olympics, including violence possibly spilling over from Rio's hundreds of slums. Authorities have said they will be prepared and that some 85,000 police and soldiers will be patrolling during the competitions.

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It's Trump's moment to talk to the nation – and GOP doubters http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729931 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729931 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 06:12:12 -0400 By Julie Pace and Robert Furlow The Associated Press By By Julie Pace and Robert Furlow The Associated Press CLEVELAND - Declaring America in crisis, Donald Trump pledged to cheering Republicans and still-skeptical voters Thursday night that as president he will restore the safety they fear they're losing, strictly curb immigration and save the nation from a Hillary Clinton record of "death, destruction, terrorism and weakness."

Confidently addressing the finale of his party's less-than-smooth national convention, the billionaire businessman declared the nation's problems too staggering to be fixed within the confines of traditional politics.

A political novice, he completed the greatest step yet in his improbable rise, accepting the GOP nomination to face Clinton, the former first lady, senator and secretary of state.

Trump's address on the closing night of the Republican convention marked his highest-profile opportunity yet to show voters he's prepared for the presidency. He set aside much of his usual bravado.

As the crowd, fiercely opposed to Clinton, broke out in its oft-used chant of, "Lock her up," he waved them off, and instead declared, "Let's defeat her in November."

He offered himself as a powerful ally of those who feel Washington has left them behind.

"I'm with you, and I will fight for you, and I will win for you," he declared. "I have joined the political arena so that the powerful can no longer beat up on people that cannot defend themselves."

He accused Clinton, his far-more-experienced Democratic rival, of utterly lacking the good judgment to serve in the White House and as the military's commander in chief.

"This is the legacy of Hillary Clinton: death, destruction and weakness," he said. "But Hillary Clinton's legacy does not have to be America's legacy."

In a direct appeal to Americans shaken by a summer of violence at home and around the world, Trump promised that if he takes office in January, "safety will be restored."

As Trump moved into the general election campaign, he stuck to the controversial proposals of his primary campaign, including building a wall along the entire U.S.-Mexico border and suspending immigration from nations "compromised by terrorism."

But in a nod to a broader swath of Americans, he vowed to protect gays and lesbians from violence and oppression, and said he would ensure that young people in predominantly black cities "have as much of a right to live out their dreams as any other child in America."

He was introduced by his daughter Ivanka who announced a childcare policy proposal that the campaign had not mentioned before.

"As president, my father will change the labor laws that were put in place at a time when women weren't a significant portion of the workplace, and he will focus on making quality childcare affordable and accessible for all," she said.

Trump took the stage in Cleveland facing a daunting array of challenges, many of his own making. Though he vanquished 16 primary rivals, he's viewed with unprecedented negativity by the broader electorate, and is struggling in particular with younger voters and minorities, groups GOP leaders know they need for the party to grow.

The first three days of this week's convention e gathering bordered on chaos, starting with a plagiarism charge involving his wife Melania Trump's speech and moving on to Texas Sen. Ted Cruz's dramatic refusal to endorse him from the convention stage.

Then, Trump sparked more questions about his Oval Office readiness by suggesting in the midst of the convention that the U.S. might not defend America's NATO partners with him as president. The remarks, in an interview published online Wednesday by The New York Times, deviate from decades of American doctrine and seem to reject the 67-year-old alliance's bedrock principle of collective defense.

Trump did not repeat those comments from the convention stage. But he did disavow America's foreign policy posture under both Democrat and Republican presidents, criticizing "fifteen years of wars in the Middle East" and declaring that "Americanism, not globalism, will be our credo."

"As long as we are led by politicians who will not put 'America First,' then we can be assured that other nations will not treat America with respect," he said.

He had promised to describe "major, major" tax cuts. But his economic proposals Thursday night were vague, centering on unspecified plans to create millions of jobs. He promised a "simplified" tax system for the middle class and businesses, fewer regulations and renegotiation of trade deals that he says have put working class Americans at a disadvantage.

"These are the forgotten men and women of our country," he said. "People who work hard but no longer have a voice."

At every turn, Trump drew sharp contrasts with Clinton, casting her as both unqualified for the presidency and too tied to Washington elites to understand voters' struggles.

Her greatest accomplishment, Trump said, was avoiding punishment from the FBI for her use of a private email and personal server while as secretary of state.

Indeed, Clinton was aggressively attacked throughout the four-day Republican convention, with delegates repeatedly chanting, "Lock her up."

Democrats will formally nominate Clinton at their convention next week in Philadelphia. Clinton was on the verge of naming a running mate to join her in taking on Trump and his vice presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, in the general election. Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine has emerged as her top choice.

AP writers Kathleen Hennessey, Josh Lederman, Alan Fram and Thomas Beaumont in Cleveland, and John Hanna in Topeka, Kansas, contributed to this report.

Follow Julie Pace at http://twitter.com/jpaceDC

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Cleveland police chief hits the streets to keep the peace http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729932 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160721/GZ0113/160729932 Thu, 21 Jul 2016 06:11:20 -0400 By MARK GILLISPIE and MIKE SISAK The Associated Press By By MARK GILLISPIE and MIKE SISAK The Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) - Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams has never been far from the action during the Republican convention, taking charge when a flag-burning turned into a melee, stepping in when demonstrators nearly came to blows and joining bicycle officers on patrol.

"I don't stand by. I'm still a police officer. I'm out there to make sure nothing happens," he said Wednesday, Day 3 of the four-day political gathering that has focused the eyes of the world on the chief and his 1,500-member department.

The convention represents a stern test for the Cleveland police force: Fears of violence are running high during this mean summer of racially charged bloodshed in the U.S. and extremist attacks abroad. And the department has a troubled history when it comes to restraint and the use of force against minorities.

On Wednesday afternoon, 17 people were arrested during a melee that authorities said erupted after a member of a revolutionary group tried to burn a flag and instead caught himself on fire. Two officers suffered slight injuries.

That brought to 22 the number of people arrested during the convention, well below the many hundreds some feared.

"Right now, I think so far, so good," Williams said Wednesday night. "We're still out there, we're still vigilant, to make sure we finish this day and the last day tomorrow on a positive note."

City officials have been hoping for a mostly trouble-free convention to help repair the reputation of the Cleveland police, who are operating under federal supervision after a U.S. Justice Department investigation found a pattern of excessive force and violations of people's civil rights.

In 2012, Cleveland police killed two unarmed black people in a 137-bullet barrage after a high-speed chase that began when officers mistook engine backfire for gunshots. Two years later, Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old black boy, was killed by a white officer while playing with what turned out to be a pellet gun.

While the Secret Service is responsible for security at the convention hall itself, Williams - a 52-year-old black man who has been chief for 2½ years - is in charge of the rest of Cleveland, with help from thousands of local, state and federal law enforcement officers.

Instead of confining himself to headquarters or a command center, Williams is often close to the action out on the streets.

On Tuesday, when a menacing crowd closed in around right-wing radio host Alex Jones in the city's Public Square, Williams himself waded in and hustled Jones away to an SUV.

Later that day, the chief broke up a gathering of what he called "hooligans" wearing bandanas over their faces. And for good measure, he spent three hours riding with bicycle officers on patrol that night.

On Wednesday, the chief was at the site of the flag-burning melee, trying to restore order and personally checking convention delegates' credentials to help usher them past the chaos and into the arena.

The department has also been relying heavily on 300 bicycle cops, who are highly mobile yet not as intimidating as officers in cruisers. The bicycle officers have literally kept protesters in line, turning their bikes sideways to keep opposing protest groups apart.

Sixteen-year-old Hashime Hill, of Cleveland, approached Williams as the chief was making his rounds Wednesday afternoon. Hashime said he wanted to become a police officer someday.

"I like him because he's an active chief," the teenager said. "He comes out of the office and he talks to the people. He gets to understand. He asks us what's going on, shakes hands and talks to the kids. Not like the other people who stay in the office. He's cool."

Some protesters, too, had praise for the police during the opening days of the convention.

Jesse Gonzalez, 26, of Lakewood, Ohio, carried a rifle on the Public Square while wearing a camouflage-style "Make America Great Again" hat. Gun owners in Ohio can legally carry their weapons in the open. Williams said police officers have been approaching those carrying guns to let them know what's expected of them.

Gonzalez said he has had "really, really super-friendly conversations" with officers inquiring about the type of weapon he has. So far, he said, the police have been "really professional."

"I'm very happy that everything's been so civil, despite all the shouting," he said.

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Writer-director Garry Marshall dies at age 81 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160720/GZ0606/160729982 GZ0606 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160720/GZ0606/160729982 Wed, 20 Jul 2016 08:13:40 -0400 By LYNN ELBER The Associated Press By By LYNN ELBER The Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) - Writer-director Garry Marshall, whose deft touch with comedy and romance led to a string of TV hits that included "Happy Days" and "Laverne & Shirley" and the box-office successes "Pretty Woman" and "Runaway Bride," has died. He was 81.

Marshall died Tuesday in at a hospital in Burbank, California, of complications from pneumonia after having a stroke, his publicist Michelle Bega said in a statement.

The director also had an on-screen presence, using his New York accent and gruff delivery in colorful supporting roles that included a practical-minded casino boss unswayed by Albert Brooks' disastrous luck in "Lost in America" and a crass network executive in "Soapdish."

"A great, great guy and the best casino boss in the history of film," actor-filmmaker Brooks posted on Twitter.

Henry Winkler, who starred as Fonzie on "Happy Days," saluted Marshall in a tweet as "larger than life, funnier than most, wise and the definition of friend."

Richard Gere, who starred opposite Julia Roberts in "Pretty Woman," said in a statement that "everyone loved Garry. He was a mentor and a cheerleader and one of the funniest men who ever lived. He had a heart of the purest gold and a soul full of mischief. He was Garry."

Marshall, brother of actress-director Penny Marshall, earned a degree in journalism from Northwestern University and worked at the New York Daily News. But he found he was better at writing punchlines.

"In the neighborhood where we grew up in, the Bronx, you only had a few choices," Marshall said in a 1980s interview. "You were either an athlete or a gangster, or you were funny."

He rejected retirement, serving as a consultant on CBS' 2015 reboot of "The Odd Couple," starring Matthew Perry and Thomas Lennon, and appearing in an episode this year as Oscar's father, Walter. Among his final credits was "Mother's Day," a film released last April starring Jennifer Aniston, Kate Hudson and Roberts.

He began his entertainment career in the 1960s selling jokes to comedians, then moved to writing sketches for "The Tonight Show" with Jack Paar in New York. He caught the eye of comic Joey Bishop, who brought him to Los Angeles to write for "The Joey Bishop Show."

Sitcoms quickly proved to be Marshall's forte. He and then-writing partner Jerry Belson turned out scripts for the most popular comedies of the '60s, including "The Lucy Show," "The Danny Thomas Show" and "The Dick Van Dyke Show."

Marshall and Belson detoured into screenwriting in 1967 with "How Sweet It Is," starring Debbie Reynolds, and followed it up with "The Grasshopper" (1970) with Jacqueline Bisset. But the two men kept their hand in TV.

In 1970, they turned Neil Simon's Broadway hit, "The Odd Couple," into a sitcom starring Jack Klugman and Tony Randall and produced by Marshall. It ran for five seasons and proved the beginning of a TV sitcom empire.

In January 1979, Marshall had three of the top five comedies on the air with "Happy Days," which ran from 1974-84; "Laverne & Shirley" (1976-83), which starred Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams, and "Mork & Mindy" (1978-82) with newcomer Robin Williams.

"The New Odd Couple," a reboot with African-American actors Ron Glass and Demond Wilson in the lead roles, aired from 1982-83 but was less successful.

Marshall defended his body of TV work, which won more viewers than honors, in his 1995 autobiography, "Wake Me When It's Funny," written with his daughter, Lori Marshall.

"Critics have knocked me for targeting society's lowest common denominator," he wrote. "I believe that television was, and still is, the only medium that can truly reach society's lowest common denominator and entertain those people who maybe can't afford a movie or a play. So why not reach them and do it well?" he said.

Penny Marshall told The New York Times in 2001 that her brother "has a life. He's not into the show business glitterati. If he has a hot movie, that's great. But if he has something that doesn't do great, he's not around those people who won't speak to you or will make you feel terrible."

After cranking out what Marshall once estimated to be 1,000 sitcom episodes, he switched his focus to the big screen with 1984's "The Flamingo Kid," a coming-of-age story starring Matt Dillon, which Marshall wrote and directed.

He concentrated on directing with his later films, including 1986's "Nothing in Common," with Tom Hanks and Jackie Gleason; "Overboard" (1987) starring Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell; "Beaches" (1988) with Bette Midler and Barbara Hershey; "Pretty Woman" (1990) and "Dear God" (1996) with Greg Kinnear and Laurie Metcalf.

The Gere-Roberts pairing that helped make "Pretty Woman" a smash hit did the same for "Runaway Bride," which reunited them in 1999. "The Princess Diaries" in 2001 was another winner, although Marshall suffered a flop with "Georgia Rule" (2007), starring Jane Fonda and Lindsay Lohan.

Marshall is survived by his wife, Barbara, and the couple's three children, Lori, Kathleen and Scott.

Funeral services will be private but a memorial is being planned for his birthday on Nov. 13, his publicist's statement said.

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Trump children woo donors and campaign hopes, voters http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160720/GZ0113/160729983 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160720/GZ0113/160729983 Wed, 20 Jul 2016 06:19:24 -0400 By JULIE BYKOWICZ The Associated Press By By JULIE BYKOWICZ The Associated Press CLEVELAND (AP) - Sometimes the skeptical donors ask Andy Puzder what it is that he sees in Donald Trump, the controversial Republican presidential nominee for whom Puzder is raising money.

"The kids," Puzder says he often replies. "If he's such an evil villain, how do you explain the kids?"

The eldest four, Ivanka, Eric, Donald Jr. and Tiffany, are being introduced to the world with prime-time speaking slots this week at the Republican National Convention. Trump loyalists are thrilled to see them in the spotlight, predicting they will take the edge off a candidate known for biting remarks that have offended women and immigrants, among others.

Trump's fundraisers know this to be true; for them, the children have long been a touchstone.

"It's a good way to start a conversation because it's all positive," says Puzder, one of Trump's California finance chairmen and the chief executive of several fast-food chains. "Everybody knows you can't fake good children. You either have them or you don't."

Eric Trump is scheduled to speak Wednesday and Ivanka on Thursday, just before her father. Donald Trump Jr. and Tiffany Trump took the stage Tuesday night and delivered well-regarded remarks, with Tiffany telling a story of how her father encouraged her studies and Donald Jr. talking about growing up alongside his father at job sites and boardrooms.

"I've seen it time and time again: that look in his eyes when someone says it can't be done," he said. "I saw that look a little over a year ago when he was told he couldn't possibly succeed in politics.

"Yes, he did."

The eldest three hold executive positions at their father's New York-based real estate company, the Trump Organization. Tiffany graduated this year from the University of Pennsylvania.

"People think that one of Donald Trump's extraordinary qualities is the values and work ethic he has instilled in his kids," says Steven Mnuchin, Trump's national finance chairman.

Not only have they been some of Trump's most trusted political advisers, Mnuchin says, but they'll likely be some of his best fundraising surrogates, starting next week.

On Monday, Donald Trump Jr. is to be the featured guest at a Houston fundraiser, the first solo appearance at such an event by any of the Trump children.

An email promoting the dinner bills it as "a great opportunity to hear from Donald J. Trump's eldest son in a private setting on how we can rebuild our nation's trust in government."

"I think he will be a tremendous draw," says Mica Mosbacher, who is raising money for Trump and knows his children personally from the social scene in New York City, where she resides part-time. "Donors are anxious to get to know the family. They'll be swayed."

When Mosbacher chats with would-be donors, she says some ask her to explain how Trump would be good for the country's women. After all, Democrats are running frequent advertisements featuring Trump sound bites such as one where he says it's hard for a flat-chested woman to be a "10."

"I say, 'Look at his family. To his credit, the children are all hard-working, good people with good values, good principles,"' Mosbacher says. "They stop and think and say back to me, 'You know, you're right.' "

Ralph Reed, a longtime Republican operative and leader of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, says 10 years ago he viewed Trump as "a master self-promoter and marketer, and I really had no positive view beyond that."

Then he and his wife sat next to Ivanka Trump at a dinner in Park City, Utah.

"She was the most charming, gracious, intelligent, beautiful, polite young lady I had just about ever met," Reed said. "When we left, I said to my wife, 'Well, I'm probably going to have to reassess my opinion of Donald Trump."'

He later shared the story with Trump, and the businessman told him, "'Ralph, you wouldn't believe how many people tell me that,"' Reed says.

Reed says donors - and anyone else who meets the children - are likely to be similarly moved. "For many people who have a desire to get behind and support their father, I think they will really help people overcome whatever hesitation it is that they might have."

For Republican donors who have little positive to say about Trump, the children are a safe topic.

Last month at a gathering of 2012 Republican nominee Mitt Romney's friends and top donors, John Rakolta Jr., was wringing his hands about whether he'd ever be able to support this year's nominee. Just days earlier, Trump had said a federal judge's Mexican heritage prevents him from fairly overseeing a lawsuit against him. (Trump launched his campaign by saying people entering the United States illegally from Mexico include rapists and criminals.)

Rakolta cringed when his friend Puzder, also there, approached. But Puzder sidestepped what could have been an uncomfortable conversation about "candidate Trump" by focusing on "father Trump."

"Can't argue that the kids are phenomenal," Rakolta said at the time, "He must be doing something right."

A few weeks later, Trump announced an expanded finance team. Among the new names: Rakolta.

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Trump is GOP nominee, completing stunning climb http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160719/GZ0113/160719498 GZ0113 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160719/GZ0113/160719498 Tue, 19 Jul 2016 19:25:48 -0400 By Julie Pace The Associated Press By By Julie Pace The Associated Press CLEVELAND - United for a night, Republicans nominated Donald Trump Tuesday as their presidential standard-bearer, capping the billionaire businessman's stunning takeover of the GOP and propelling him into a November faceoff with Democrat Hillary Clinton.

"This is a movement, but we have to go all the way," Trump said in videotaped remarks beamed into the convention hall.

For Trump, the celebrations were a much-needed opportunity to regroup after a chaotic convention kickoff that included a plagiarism charge involving wife Melania Trump's address on opening night. There were no big missteps Tuesday, but the event was void of the glitzy, Hollywood touch Trump promised, with a series of Republican officials parading on stage to level sharp, but repetitive, criticisms of Clinton.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was one of the few speakers to energize the crowd, delivering a full-throated takedown of Clinton and imploring delegates to shout "Guilty!" as he ticked through numerous accusations of wrongdoing.

"We didn't disqualify Hillary Clinton to be president of the United States, the facts of her life and career disqualifies her," Christie said.

Trump's family again took center stage, underscoring the campaign's urgent task to reshape the image of a candidate seen by large swaths of voters as harsh and divisive. Two of Trump's children testified to his character, casting him as a man undeterred by challenges.

"For my father, impossible is just the starting point," said Donald Trump Jr., the oldest of the Republican nominee's five children.

For some Republicans, the night also offered a glimpse of what could have been. House Speaker Paul Ryan, who resisted calls to jump into the presidential race, made a vigorous call for party unity - though his message focused more on the risks of letting Democrats keep the White House and make gains in Congress than a rationale for Trump.

"Let's compete in every part of America, and turn out at the polls like every last vote matters, because it will," Ryan said.

Many Republican leaders stayed away from the convention, still wary of being associated with the divisive candidate and unsure how his nomination impacts their own political futures.

The crowd gathered in the cavernous convention hall reflected the growing dissatisfaction among some Republicans with party elites. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has been a lukewarm supporter of Trump, was greeted with a smattering of boos as he took the stage.

It was one of the occasional flurries of dissent on the convention floor, including jeers as states that Trump did not win recorded their votes during the nominating roll call vote. Still, Trump far outdistanced his primary rivals, and his vice presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, was also formally nominated.

Trump was put over the top by his home state of New York. Four of his children joined the state's delegation on the convention floor for the historic moment and appeared overwhelmed with emotion.

Tiffany Trump, the candidate's 22-year-old daughter with ex-wife Marla Maples, sprinkled her remarks with rarely heard anecdotes about her father, including the handwritten notes he left on her childhood report cards.

"My dad is a natural born encourager, the last person to ever tell you to lower your sights," she said.

Melania Trump was praised for making progress in highlighting her husband's personal qualities during her Monday night address. She spoke of his "simple goodness" and his loyalty and love of family - while noting the "drama" that comes with Trump in politics.

But her speech was quickly overtaken by charges that it included two passages - each 30 words or longer - that matched a 2008 Democratic convention address by Michelle Obama nearly word-for-word.

Trump's campaign offered no apologies, with top adviser Paul Manafort telling The Associated Press the matter had been "totally blown out of proportion."

Still, the plagiarism controversy and other unforced errors by the campaign cast a shadow over the convention and raised fresh questions about Trump's oversight of his campaign, which gives voters a window into how a candidate might handle the pressures of the presidency.

Clinton pounced on the tumult, saying the Republican gathering had so far been "surreal," comparing it to the classic fantasy film "Wizard of Oz."

"When you pull back the curtain, it was just Donald Trump with nothing to offer to the American people," Clinton said during a speech in Las Vegas.

Trump's campaign did succeed in tamping down late efforts by dissident delegates to derail the convention, including during Tuesday's roll call vote. Campaign officials invested significant time arguing to delegates about the importance of presenting a unite front during the televised convention.

"United we stand, divided we fall," said Johnny McMahan, a Trump delegate from Arkansas.

But Colorado's Kendal Unruh, a leader of the anti-Trump forces, called the convention a "sham" and warned party leaders that their efforts to silence opposition would keep some Republicans on the sidelines in the fall campaign against Clinton.

What political news is the world searching for on Google and talking about on Twitter? Find out via AP's Election Buzz interactive. http://elections.ap.org/buzz

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Norovirus strikes the Republican National Convention http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160719/GZ01/160719512 GZ01 http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20160719/GZ01/160719512 Tue, 19 Jul 2016 14:31:42 -0400 By Joel Achenbach, Elahe Izadi and Ed O’Keefe The Washington Post By By Joel Achenbach, Elahe Izadi and Ed O’Keefe The Washington Post CLEVELAND - The highly contagious norovirus appears to have hit the Republican National Convention.

A dozen California Republican Party staff members, who arrived last week in Ohio ahead of the state's delegates, have fallen ill with the virus, said Jim Brulte, chairman of the state GOP.

So far, none of the state's 550 delegates appear to have caught the virus.

"Our best guess is that this came from California," Brulte said. The first staffer to fall ill infected her spouse.

The delegates from California are staying at the Kalahari Resort in Sandusky, nearly 60 miles away from the Cleveland arena where the convention is being staged.

State party officials have suggested that delegates frequently wash their hands, avoid shaking hands and sharing food and stay off delegation buses to the convention arena if they exhibit any symptoms of norovrius.

"You'll know if you have it," Cynthia Bryant, executive director of the state GOP, said, according to an email cited by the Sacramento Bee. "We will work out other means of transportation."

The virus can be caught through contact from infected people or surfaces, or through consuming contaminated food or water. And it spreads quickly in closed places, such as cruise ships, schools and nursing homes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Norovirus inflames the stomach, the intestines - or both. Symptoms include stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. Such symptoms can be especially dangerous for young children and older adults.

Every year, about 19 to 21 million people become sick with norovirus; about 570 to 800 people die annually from it, according to the CDC.

The infected individuals first began showing symptoms on Thursday, and Erie County health officials have taken fecal samples for analysis, the Plain Dealer reported.

"It looks like the norovirus, but we're not going to say that's definitively what it is," Erie County Health Commissioner Pete Schade told the newspaper.

In Ohio, hand sanitizer dispensers were spotted Monday night at the resort where the California delegates are staying, the Los Angeles Times reported.

"We worked with the hotel to add sanitizing stations in and around the area where our delegation activities," Brulte said.

The African-themed Kalahari Resort in Sandusky has 884 guest rooms, according to a company website. The property features indoor and outdoor water parks and an outdoor adventure park.

A spokesperson with the resort did not immediately return The Post's inquiry.

"We're in touch with the California delegation about this," Audrey Scagnelli, spokeswoman for the RNC. "They're working with local health officials and are taking all the necessary precautions to contain the virus. We'll continue to monitor the situation and ensure the delegation and staff have everything they need."

News reports of the California delegation's accommodations surfaced earlier this year, when state GOP leaders complained that they were being put up so far from the convention site.

"We're pretty bitter about that," California GOP vice chairwoman Harmeet Dhillon told CNN in May. " . . . we're like the ugly stepchild. They need us for our cash and our donors, they don't need us for anything else."

The complaints prompted convention organizers to bristle at suggestions they had dropped the ball on accommodating the GOP's largest delegation or that the California delegates were being penalized for coming from a state that hasn't historically been friendly to Republicans.

"We've had all of the hotels contracted for nearly a year and met every obligation," David Gilbert, CEO of Destination Cleveland, said in a recent interview. "Ninety-five percent of every hotel room being used for the convention is within 35 miles of downtown."

Gilbert, whose visitor's bureau organized convention activities, said that delegations that are farther out "are in a couple of very large properties that are housing larger groups."

California GOP staffers were briefed at a Tuesday morning breakfast about the situation, Brulte said.

"Right now our delegates, alternates, and guests are at one of three places," Brulte said. "Cedar point, the Pro football Hall of Fame in Canton Ohio, or relaxing at the Sandusky resort."

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