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I don’t have much to report about my own cancer treatment this week. I’m laser focused on the last of my chemotherapy treatments, which should be this week.

But seeing as how my column is about having cancer during the pandemic, I thought I’d take this opportunity to tell you about how COVID-19 has affected cancer patients in general. Michelle Chappell and Juliana Frederick of the American Cancer Society were nice enough to let me pick their brains on the topic.

According to a survey conducted this spring by the American Cancer Society, the most commonly reported impact to cancer patients and survivors was a delay in health care.

The organization surveyed 1,200 cancer patients and survivors. It found that 79 percent of those in active cancer treatment and 78 percent of those not in active treatment experienced delays in their health care because of COVID-19.

Missing health care appointments can mean that doctors don’t find cancer recurrences as quickly as they would otherwise.

“Cancer care includes a range of services, including consultation with providers to plan and administer care for their cancer; anti-cancer therapies and surgery; imaging to determine if their cancer has grown or returned; and other health care directly related to their cancer,” Frederick said. “Checkups and screenings are an important part of cancer survivor follow-up care, and delaying or missing these could delay the detection of a recurrence of their cancer.”

One fifth of the cancer patients and survivors who were surveyed said they were concerned that their cancer was growing or that it had returned because of delays in getting health care.

Seventeen percent of those who were surveyed reported a delay in their cancer treatment such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy or radiation. Luckily for me, I didn’t share that experience with them.

The number of certain types of cancer screenings also decreased during COVID-19, which could prevent doctors from finding and treating cancer when it’s at an early stage. Between January and April of this year, the number of screenings for colon cancer given nationally was down 90 percent compared to 2019, Chappell told me. She said we won’t know how much impact that will have for two years because of a lag in cancer statistics. Colorectal cancer is one of the four most common cancers in West Virginia, along with breast cancer in women, prostate cancer in men and lung cancer.

COVID-19 has also had a direct impact on fundraising efforts by the American Cancer Society. You’re probably familiar with Relay for Life, the organization’s signature fundraising event. The Charleston Relay for Life event is typically held each year in May or June.

This year, because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the nonprofit agency had to cancel in-person Relay for Life events across the country. As I’ve written, cancer patients, like others with underlying health issues, are particularly at-risk for complications from COVID-19, so it makes sense that the ACS wouldn’t want to host these events that might put the people they help at risk. So the fundraisers have been moved online for this year. I’ve signed up to help raise money for the organization. Donors can contribute through October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

The nonprofit organization supports cancer research and also offers patient services through a 24-hour cancer information hotline for patients and caregivers. In cities with large cancer treatment centers, it offers patients a place to stay with its Hope Lodges. The organization also has lobbyists who advocate for cancer prevention and access to care at the state and federal levels.

You can help me reach my goal of $2,500 by donating here: http://main.acsevents.org/goto/loriakersey.

Contact Lori Kersey at lorikersey@gmail.com or follow her on Twitter @LoriKerseyWV. You can also read her blog at notesforthememoir.com.