Crewmen prepare the ground for grass to be planted on the traffic island on Lee Street near C&P Telephone Co. building. The Municipal Beautification Commission is sending crews to various city-owned plots of ground for similar spruce-up. March 16, 1966, photo by Earl Benton. Note: The ol…

Hair styling is the “in” thing for men according to instructors at Charleston Barber College. Students practice on Pat McFann, co-owner and instructor at the school. From left, Robert Prichard of Beckley, John Dukes, a former construction worker from Brooklyn, New York, May Fruit of Charlest…

Peace Corps members recruit new members at West Virginia State College. Interested students Robert Fields of Nitro, Randy Wharton of St. Albans, and Rufus Newlin of New York talk with volunteers recruiters Kevin Lowther, Michael Smith, Elizabeth O’Connell and Catherine Brown. Lowther spent t…

Members of the 29th annual All-Kanawha County Band Festival’s junior high band practice under the direction of William Brophy of Ohio University in preparation of a free concert at Municipal Auditorium. April 7, 1966 photo.

Elementary students who live along secondary Route 33 near Sissonville must walk across Coon Creek Bridge twice a day under supervision of bus driver C.O. Hackney. The bridge has a 3-ton weight limit. The empty bus weighs between 5 and 6 tons. Division of Highways officials say the bridge is…

Shamrock No. 2 moves houses from Kanawha Street (now Kanawha Boulevard) for the building of the new state Capitol in the mid-1920s. The barge captain is Capt. Annis Boggs. The sign reads: Being moved for Noyes and Young Realtors, Charleston, W.Va. by John Eichleay Jr. Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.

New buses began making the rounds in Charleston in 1975. The 44-passenger buses feature large windows, bucket seats, air conditioning and a new fare box that automatically registers tokens and coins so end-of-the-day counting is eliminated. March 3, 1975 photo by Chet Hawes.

South Charleston, 1952. Editor’s note: “Bend of the River,” starring James Stewart and Rock Hudson, and “Desert Passage” were both released during the spring of 1952. There appears to be a 1948 Chevrolet coming down the street. The strange-looking vehicle on the far left appears to be a 1950…

Youngsters await the start of the Kanawha County spelling bee at West Virginia State College. When it was over, Tim Davidson, 14, an eighth-grader at Spring Hill Junior High out-spelled 75 others and became county champion when he correctly spelled “gladiolus.” In 1976, the Charleston Daily …

Kearse Theatre on Summers Street was built in 1922 for $500,000 and was named for its owner, Timothy Kearse. It is no longer standing. The other establishment is Asian Import Mart. Vehicle parked out front is a 1980s Mazda hatchback.

A crowd enters the Kanawha Valley’s third Kmart when it opened its doors at 10 a.m. Larger than the stores in Kanawha City and Patrick Street Plaza, the St. Albans Mall Kmart also has a pharmacy and a lumber section. A new Kroger store is scheduled to open at the shopping center in the sprin…

Although temperatures were in the 30s, these St. Albans youngsters take advantage of a windy day by putting their kites in the air. A field off MacCorkle Avenue near Alban Elementary School made a good spot to launch the kites. Feb. 28, 1975, photo by Earl Benton.

What do you do if Congress cuts your funding and you’re stuck with a lot of old spacesuits? Pinky Conley of Nitro said she asked NASA to ship a spacesuit to her for C&P Telephone’s “Spirit of Service” party, and the agency did. Conley didn’t go into orbit, but she felt a mean gravitation…

Charleston opened this fire station on Oakridge Drive as soon as new firemen were appointed to the department. Charleston paid new firemen $4,800 a year. Another new station on Oakwood Road, near Hickory Road opened shortly after. The two stations cost a total of $154,000 to build. Jan. 21, …

After receiving a number of complaints from patrons who said they bumped their heads on the sculpture in front of the U.S. Post Office, postal officials in Charleston put a chain and a warning around the “Charleston Arch.” The sculpture is now raised up on a pair of block pedestals. Sept. 9,…

Onlookers watch as a crane prepares to seat the capping spire atop a newly built tower on the First Baptist Church in St. Albans. The 30-foot copper spire is a support for a polished aluminum cross which will be floodlighted over the church each night. The tower and spire were part of the or…

Bringing Interstate 64 closer to Charleston, the steel girders of this twin bridge carry the highway across a hollow opposite the old airport, Wertz Field, at Institute. Workers grade the approach at the site that will become an interchange. Jan. 10, 1966, photo by Earl Benton,

Topping off the Capitol with the dome and completion of the main unit was an order of business in this photo taken Jan. 1, 1931. At left, columns can be seen lying in the foreground, while the three uncarved keystones are in place on the outer wall, awaiting sculptors who will carve them in …

An early photo of Charleston shows the city before Kanawha Boulevard was constructed. Originally part of the James River and Kanawha Turnpike, the road was renamed Kanawha Boulevard in the 1920s. The new four-lane boulevard from 35th Street to the Elk River was built in the 1930s.

Capt. Chuck Yeager of Hamlin poses with his father, Hal Yeager, just before the young man took off from Kanawha Airport in his P-80 jet plane, heading back to California after a weekend visit with his parents and small son. Capt. Yeager, at the time the only living man who had repeatedly flo…

These scenes at the Charleston Post Office would be repeated as the flow of Christmas mail and packages reached another high peak. While the office hadn’t experienced the one-day peaks of previous years, mail throughout December was running more than 12% ahead of 1958. Floor workers sorted t…

Wreckage from the collapse of the Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant on Dec. 15, 1967. The bridge that once spanned the Ohio River between Point Pleasant and Kanauga, Ohio, collapsed just before 5 p.m. on Dec. 15, 1967. The bridge was packed with cars when it fell, killing 46 people. Photo by E…

The Union Carbide Corporation sold its agricultural chemicals business for $575 million in cash to the Rhone-Poulenc Group, the French chemical producer, reported Nov. 14, 1986. This undated photo by Earl Benton shows workmen replacing the sign at the Institute plant some time after the sale.

In 1937, Harold “Jigs” Ross and his brother, who now lives in Florida, opened a beer hall and billiards parlor on 25th Street in downtown Dunbar. After three years, the establishment moved up the street one block. This fall, Jigs tried something unique. He eliminated all gambling, all beer a…

It was a delightful day for the children at Marita’s Day Nursery in Charleston — the day care took the children out to buy a Christmas tree. About 30 of them took the trip, by bus and by station wagon to a West Side lot where each had a hand in selecting just the right tree. Here they load u…

Frances Swope (center) was one of many Kanawha County Public Library employees who sorted, packed, labeled and stacked some 200,000 books, periodicals and newspapers for transfer to the new library quarters on Capitol Street. Nov. 16, 1966, photo by Chet Hawes.

Capital City Jamboree, photographed on Nov. 13, 1973, opened in the old Custer Theater at 305 Washington St. W. in January 1973. The TV program, initially planned for airing on WCHS after the first of the year, was a weekly series patterned after Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry.

Communications is an important part of law enforcement. An Explorer Scout receives instruction in teletype operations at State Police detachment Co. B in South Charleston from Trooper R.A. Long (seated) and South Charleston Police Detective Jim McMillion. Explorer Scouts interested in law en…

Running neck and neck for the 14th Kanawha County House of Delegates seat in 1966, Thomas Knight and Russell Davisson checked vote by vote the totals on machines as the official canvas got underway in a Dunbar warehouse. Knight (left, front) stands beside Davisson as the two watch County Com…

Mayor John Hutchinson pins a new badge on Police Chief John Bailes as Lt. L.E. Edwards waits for his. The presentation began the observance of National Police Week. The entire 172-person force received both breast and hat badges, which cost the city $8,000. May 12, 1975, photo by William Tiernan.

Senator Chapman Revercomb, President Dwight Eisenhower, Senator John Hoblitzell Jr. (with campaign sign), Governor Cecil Underwood and Charleston Mayor John Copnehaver (far right). The president came to Charleston to urge the election of a Republican Congress. Nov. 28, 1958, photo by Chet Hawes.

Workers remove a sign on Interstate 77 instructing motorists to use the Eden’s Fork exit. With the opening of the Fort Hill bridge, formally known as the Eugene A. Carter Memorial Bridge, traveling into Charleston on W.Va. 21 became unnecessary. Aug. 18, 1975 photo by William Tiernan.

Charleston Building Commissioner D.H. Gay admires the view from the roof of the new 12-story Holiday Inn Charleston House, with City Hall and the Kanawha County Courthouse in the foreground, Kanawha Boulevard stretching westward, and Union Carbide’s South Charleston plant in the distance. Ei…

At 4 a.m., while most of Charleston sleeps, baker Eddie Parsons will be preparing doughnuts for the coming morning at the Mister Donut shop in Kanawha City. Aug. 6, 1975 photo by William Tiernan.