Frances Swope (center) was one of many Kanawha County Public Library employees who sorted, packed, labeled and stacked some 200,000 books, periodicals and newspapers for transfer to the new library quarters on Capitol Street. Nov. 16, 1966, photo by Chet Hawes.

Capital City Jamboree, photographed on Nov. 13, 1973, opened in the old Custer Theater at 305 Washington St. W. in January 1973. The TV program, initially planned for airing on WCHS after the first of the year, was a weekly series patterned after Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry.

Communications is an important part of law enforcement. An Explorer Scout receives instruction in teletype operations at State Police detachment Co. B in South Charleston from Trooper R.A. Long (seated) and South Charleston Police Detective Jim McMillion. Explorer Scouts interested in law en…

Running neck and neck for the 14th Kanawha County House of Delegates seat in 1966, Thomas Knight and Russell Davisson checked vote by vote the totals on machines as the official canvas got underway in a Dunbar warehouse. Knight (left, front) stands beside Davisson as the two watch County Com…

Mayor John Hutchinson pins a new badge on Police Chief John Bailes as Lt. L.E. Edwards waits for his. The presentation began the observance of National Police Week. The entire 172-person force received both breast and hat badges, which cost the city $8,000. May 12, 1975, photo by William Tiernan.

Senator Chapman Revercomb, President Dwight Eisenhower, Senator John Hoblitzell Jr. (with campaign sign), Governor Cecil Underwood and Charleston Mayor John Copnehaver (far right). The president came to Charleston to urge the election of a Republican Congress. Nov. 28, 1958, photo by Chet Hawes.

Workers remove a sign on Interstate 77 instructing motorists to use the Eden’s Fork exit. With the opening of the Fort Hill bridge, formally known as the Eugene A. Carter Memorial Bridge, traveling into Charleston on W.Va. 21 became unnecessary. Aug. 18, 1975 photo by William Tiernan.

Charleston Building Commissioner D.H. Gay admires the view from the roof of the new 12-story Holiday Inn Charleston House, with City Hall and the Kanawha County Courthouse in the foreground, Kanawha Boulevard stretching westward, and Union Carbide’s South Charleston plant in the distance. Ei…

Despite protests, one of Charleston’s last brick streets, Laurel Road in South Hills, is made ready for asphalt resurfacing by city workmen. Several residents objected to the job, but Mayor Shanklin said those in favor of it far outnumber them. He said the street becomes dangerously slick wh…

A street sweeper makes his way down a Charleston street during the cool of the night. Workers prefer the late hours with less traffic and without the heat of the day. Aug. 6, 1975, photo by William Tiernan.

Passengers at the train station in Charleston wait and load their bags onto an old cart. Aug 6, 1975, photo by William Tiernan. 

Armco Steel Corp. kicked off a three-day celebration in commemoration of its 75 years of operations. Armco employs approximately 1,100 miners in its Boone and Raleigh county mines. Entertainment included cable-car rides, local music talent, and 10,000 hot dogs. Aug. 8, 1975, photo.

Former Charleston Charlies in town for the Pittsburgh Pirates vs. International League All-Star Game. First row: Craig Reynolds, Art Howe, Willie Randolph, Larry Demery, Frank Taveras. Back row: Richie Zisk, John Candelaria, Kent Tekulve, Bruce Kison, Dave Parker. Missing: Rennie Stennent, R…

Aug. 10, 1963. Finding the doors to the White Pantry restaurant locked, anti-segregation protesters turned to singing hymns and hand clapping. The group, known as the Civic Interest Progressives, is made up mostly of college students. The Huntington business locked its doors when the group a…

Mayor Elmer Dodson presented Darrell Holbrook, 8-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Holbrook of Big Tyler Road, a plaque as state winner in the Tinkertoy contest. Darrell, then a student at Tyler Elementary, built his model radar antenna which revolves by turning a crank. May 15, 1969, photo…

Youngsters compete in the state finals of the National Hula Hoop contest held at the Charleston Civic Center. The top two winners would get a chance to compete in the regional competition in Philadelphia. July 23, 1976, photo by William Tiernan.

Kids can turn anything into a good time. Several young City Park Village residents turned two old mattresses into a trampoline and experimented for the most extravagant or most impressive leap into the skies. July 12, 1974, photo by William Tiernan.

The Kanawha County Parks and Recreation Commission’s new mobile playground got a good workout when it parked at Ruthlawn Elementary School on June 30, 1969. The playground is one of several pilot projects designed to provide recreational facilities for children in rural areas of the county.

Rushing full speed ahead to the centennial promenade were Belles of Kan-A-Wha members Marjorie Gregg, Clara Boyd, Elizabeth Lupardus and Dorothy First. The promenade through downtown Charleston was led by the Beni Kedem Shrine caliope and trio. June 16, 1963 photo.

Buying liquor was just like buying groceries at the remodeled and updated store in South Charleston in 1969. The self-service store was the first of several to be tried by the state. On hand to greet customers and to see that the operation got off to a smooth start was Bob O’Dell, special as…

A new right-turning lane taking shape on MacCorkle Avenue at 35th Street was a joint project of the City of Charleston and the State Road Commission. It would allow traffic to “peel off” and continue on past Watt Powell Park, preventing clogged lanes during heavy traffic. June 23, 1967 photo…