Historic marker sign in Ravenswood, that reads, “Ohio River Ford: Sand Creek Riffle, where the Indians and pioneers crossed the Ohio, was used by General Jenkins when he carried the Confederate flag into Ohio in 1862, and also by the Union Army under General Lightburn in its retreat the same…

Miners who represent the West Virginia Black Lung Association carried in and deposited a casket in the lobby of the Statehouse, put a funeral wreath on it and draped on a white sheet with inscription: “Compensation we are asking, while alive and still a’gasping; when life is o’er and hymns a…

It would be several days before some 800 students could start class again at Clay County High School. Students and town residents survey what is left of the main high school building after a pre-dawn fire of undetermined origin gutted it. The original building opened in 1912. Jan. 28, 1969, …

Farmer’s Hardware, located below the Alderson Hotel, was located at Virginia and Alderson streets, Charleston. Alderson Street would eventually be connected to Laidley Street and the entire street would be renamed Laidley Street. Dec. 23, 1959 photo.

This cardboard “cutie” welcoming customers throughout the country is none other than Charleston’s own Jennie Smith, a popular vocalist. Jennie, 29, is actually Jo Ann Kristof and has singing engagements throughout the country and with RCA Victor records. This particular cutout can be found a…

Charleston appears ready for winter weather that might lay ahead. City manager Vincent Reishman, Mayor Elmer Dodd and Street Commissioner E.A. McCoy view the three new salt trucks recently purchased by the city. Jan. 2, 1969 photo by Ray Wheeler.

Before this job is finished, Raymond Concrete Pile Co. will have driven more than 400 steel pilings along the edge of the new federal building excavation. The office and courtroom structure will be located on Quarrier Street, between Laidley and Court streets. Dec. 22, 1959 photo by Ray Wheeler.

The Toys for Tots campaign, sponsored by the Salvation Army, the U.S. Marine Corps. and the Charleston Daily Mail, exceeded its goal of collecting more than 18,000 toys. Two women look over the arsenal of toy guns that will soon be distributed to children. Dec. 22, 1959 photo by Ray Wheeler.

Rain, fog, dipping temperatures, the angry honking of car horns and the shrill whistle of a shrouded policeman directing traffic greeted holiday shoppers in downtown Charleston the day after Thanksgiving. Nov. 23, 1973 photo by Earl Benton.

Bob DeHart, owner of an all-electric car, checks out the 20 six-volt batteries in the 1968 model vehicle he purchased from Monongahela Power Co. The Mars II Renault, at a cost of $13,000, is only one of six in the U.S. DeHart admits the vehicle is not practical for long-distance travel, but …

In the back of the state Capitol, a white spruce grown at EvUn-Breth Acres, a United Methodist Church education center near Buckhannon, twinkles at night. Dec. 11, 1975, photo by William Tiernan.

Charleston Post Office called extra hands into service as Christmas mail from all points of the compass zeroed in on the local facility. The postal workers handled nearly 1.5 million letters, parcels and other classes of mail. Dec. 14, 1967 photo by Chet Hawes.

This is only a portion of the 1,500 pounds of fruit cakes being sent to servicemen in Vietnam for Christmas by the Charleston Civitan Club. Civitan Elmer Steinmetz looks on as the Rev. Clyde Murdock, chairman of the fruit cake drive, assists in the unloading at the Lee Street dock of the pos…

Shopping bags and parcels were the order of the day as hundreds of bargain-bound shoppers took advantage of the opening of Charleston Days. The semi-annual sale promotion in which more than 65 merchants are participating is not only offering a host of values but also awards to shopper regist…

The Charleston Beautification Commission is arming itself for battle in the war of billboard proliferation along inner-city interstates. One of their recommendations is to prohibit roof signs within 300 feet of interstates rights of way. These signs are located along Virginia Street and the …

Jerry Hall (left) and Darrell Shaffer make their garbage-collection rounds. John Burkett, Charleston landfill superintendent, said the plastic bag garbage system, implemented last year has “helped 500%” to make the process cleaner and to attract men to the collection jobs. Nov. 15, 1973 phot…

Virtually every 1974 American-made new car model was on display along with some "specialty" vehicles and racers for the Greater Charleston Auto Show held in the Grand Arena of the Civic Center. Nov. 14, 1973 photo by William Tiernan Note: Limited information available as this photo did not r…

Nurses Frances Ballard and Walter Bledsoe, 28, look over one of the old iron lungs at General Hospital in Charleston. Bledsoe was a polio patient from 1954-57 and spent several weeks in an iron lung at Marmet Hospital for Crippled Children where Ballard was a nurse who looked after him. Poli…

Jennifer Jarrell, 4, looks over a selection of confections at Charleston’s only exclusive candy store. Dorothy Sharp, operator of Mary Lee’s Candies next to the Daniel Boone Hotel on Washington Street, stands ready to ring up Jennifer’s selections. Alas, penny candy no longer costs just a pe…

Better late than never has become the theme for the Virginia Street underpass. After numerous delays, four sections of railroad trestle arrived and were lifted into place across the underpass excavation. This will be the city’s second underpass on the West Side. Mayor John Hutchinson said he…

The 1968 Black Walnut Festival at Spencer again presented a wide variety of activities during its three-day run. Some of the many home-canned products are being admired by Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Keffer of Spencer-Otto Route and Mrs. V. Kirby of Spencer. The canned fruits and vegetables and preser…

The Morris Harvey student union lounge in the new $1.75 million student union building at Morris Harvey College, which opened on Oct. 24, 1966, had all the comforts of home. On the first floor a snack bar was set off by a carved wooden partition, office space, game room and a main formal lou…

The give-and-take effort of Paul and Agnes Cogar earned the Webster Springs couple fourth-place honors in the crosscut saw competition at the 48th annual Mountain State Forest Festival, in Elkins. Photo by Owen Stayner, Oct. 6, 1984. More info at www.forestfestival.com.

Boggess House Moving Co. also does hangars. Four large truck beds move the General Aviation Service hangar at Kanawha Airport from its former location, near the main airport terminal, to a new area several hundred yards away. The hangar will be placed on a new foundation and remodeled, and t…

It looks like a refrigerator full of stereo equipment, but actually it’s a complex traffic light control box beside MacCorkle Avenue at Morris Harvey College. City traffic engineer Larry Riggs tested the device. The new signal system for the college traffic included eight signal light units …

Charleston Town Center opened in 1983 as the largest downtown-based shopping mall located east of the Mississippi River. At the time, it included four anchor stores: JCPenney, Sears, Kaufmann’s and Montgomery Ward. Date of this photo is unknown.

When the eastern end of the Washington Street bridge over Elk River in Charleston collapsed from its support early Sept. 20, 1971, and fell in a shower of sparks and noise, Gov. Arch Moore immediately announced that all efforts to salvage the old span went “under the bridge” and a new one wo…

Perched on a pedestal of concrete, the living room of Henry T. Eldens’ home studio, Top-O-Rock, appears to float among the treetops. The architect, standing on deck, received national recognition when Top-O-Rock was named one of 15 winners of the 1968 Architectural Award of Excellence given …

The city purchased 25 fluorescent orange emblems to place on slow-moving vehicles such as lawn mowers, tractors and snow plows. It is part of a national campaign to alert drivers that there is something ahead, in this case a slow-moving vehicle on the highway. Safety officials hope it will c…

Here’s a sampling of the crowd of out-of-state motorists who stopped by in September 1966 for the Charleston Pilot Club’s Labor Day Coffee Break held back of the state capitol. Approximately 600 traveling motorists stopped during the day for free coffee, soft drinks and cookies provided by m…

Charleston postal workers aren’t losing work time because of influenza. They lined up for a mass inoculation at the main post office. Mrs. Vincent Ciccarello (left) and Mrs. Charles Gregg (right), whose husbands are employed by the federal agency, line up clerks, carriers and secretaries to …

“Sing-Out ‘66” stopped traffic along Capitol Street during an impromptu concert on the lawn at Davis Park in front of the YMCA as 150 young people sang of the glories of Freedom and America. The “Up With People” concert, sponsored by Pace Magazine, which is the official publication of the yo…

An afternoon downpour sent a wall of water racing down Allen Fork, a long and winding creek which empties into the Poca River near the Jackson County line. Allen’s Chapel was washed from its foundation and carried 100 feet by flood waters. Aug. 19, 1980 photo.

Antique? Not really, but hunters seem to think they are. These oil-burning lamps were reported stolen from C&O Railway in the Charleston area and other parts of the state. Some were seen for sale in antique shops. Railway police, local and federal law enforcement agencies joined in the a…

Houston Astros manager Bill Virdon (second from right) stands with three of his players who had stops in Charleston on their way to the big leagues — center fielder Terry Puhl, 21; right-handed pitcher Tom Dixon, 22; and outfielder Art Howe. The Astros were in town to play an exhibition game…

Jesse Stuart likes people and writing. He found signing books for readers attending The Diamond autographing party an enjoyable task. He’s a mountain man who still lives among the people about whom he writes. His home is a clapboard-covered log house just a short distance from where he was b…

These volunteers were among a relay team that carried the Olympic flame from Canada — from left, Ronnie Peggs of St. Albans carries the torch, Charles J. Spainhour of St. Albans, Scott Miller of South Charleston, Paul Prendergast of Charleston, Roger Pitt of Sissonville, and Charles T. Spain…

Instructor Victor Amin makes a point to Geneva Foster during an eight-week course for transcription typists sponsored by the State Department of Employment Security under the Federal Work Incentive Program (WIN). Aug. 6, 1969 photo by Chet Hawes.

Charleston’s first covered mall — The Arcade — was constructed in 1895. The upper levels were trademarked by the balcony around four sides, with wrought iron railing enclosing it. July 20, 1976 photo by Earl Benton.