Mayor Elmer Dodson presented Darrell Holbrook, 8-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Holbrook of Big Tyler Road, a plaque as state winner in the Tinkertoy contest. Darrell, then a student at Tyler Elementary, built his model radar antenna which revolves by turning a crank. May 15, 1969, photo…

Youngsters compete in the state finals of the National Hula Hoop contest held at the Charleston Civic Center. The top two winners would get a chance to compete in the regional competition in Philadelphia. July 23, 1976, photo by William Tiernan.

Kids can turn anything into a good time. Several young City Park Village residents turned two old mattresses into a trampoline and experimented for the most extravagant or most impressive leap into the skies. July 12, 1974, photo by William Tiernan.

The Kanawha County Parks and Recreation Commission’s new mobile playground got a good workout when it parked at Ruthlawn Elementary School on June 30, 1969. The playground is one of several pilot projects designed to provide recreational facilities for children in rural areas of the county.

Rushing full speed ahead to the centennial promenade were Belles of Kan-A-Wha members Marjorie Gregg, Clara Boyd, Elizabeth Lupardus and Dorothy First. The promenade through downtown Charleston was led by the Beni Kedem Shrine caliope and trio. June 16, 1963 photo.

Buying liquor was just like buying groceries at the remodeled and updated store in South Charleston in 1969. The self-service store was the first of several to be tried by the state. On hand to greet customers and to see that the operation got off to a smooth start was Bob O’Dell, special as…

A new right-turning lane taking shape on MacCorkle Avenue at 35th Street was a joint project of the City of Charleston and the State Road Commission. It would allow traffic to “peel off” and continue on past Watt Powell Park, preventing clogged lanes during heavy traffic. June 23, 1967 photo…

Legionnaire Frank L. Craner retired as parade marshal of Charleston Memorial Day and Veterans Day, but his patriotism as a World War I veteran remains undiminished. In 1969, for the first time in more than 30 years, he stands on the speakers’ platform to salute the flag as it passes on Quarr…

Families in 1969 were backing off of beef if they were trying to keep their grocery budgets in balance. Housewives locally are a bit upset over the climbing cost of feeding families. Ground beef, 48 cents a pound the year before is now 57 cents a pound. T-bone steaks have gone from $1.15 to …

Here is an opened can of Civil Defense survival crackers, one of the principal items stocked in Civil Defense shelters in 1969. The Charleston Civil Defense said the crackers contain all the vitamins and minerals necessary for human life. They taste like matzo or graham crackers without grah…

A diner at one of the rest stop areas along the West Virginia Turnpike. A 1974 Daily Mail story on the conditions — cleanliness and food service quality — of the facilities reported it was not too bad. The diner featured countertop jukeboxes and posters designed by Dick O’Brien. Recent compl…

In 1973, Capitol Chrysler-Plymouth in South Charleston was the area dealer for the PPV (People-Powered Vehicle), a three-wheeled bicycle with a fiberglass body. The two occupants pedal and one steers and brakes. Lynn Hudnail (back), company sales manager, said that of the three ordered, two …

A bunny and a spring flower greeted Taft Elementary students registering for fall kindergarten and first level classes. Welcoming Mrs. Charles Leach and her son, Tony, were first-graders Timmy Robinson, the bunny, and Gina Jarrett, the flower. March 10, 1972, photo by Earl Benton.

Bob Barker holds a bird’s nest that was found in an evergreen that was cut down on his parents’ property in Charleston on March 30, 1967. Ann Shreve, an authority on birds, believes it could be the nest of a wood thrush, a grackle, or a crow. The unusual thing about it was that it included b…

A woman in Meadow Bridge points out the path of a tornado that destroyed 50 buildings and killed a 3-year-old girl when her family’s mobile home was tossed 75 yards through the air. Destructive tornado storms struck across the country, killing more than 300 in five states on April 5, 1974. P…

Dozens of M113 armored personnel carriers line the parking grounds at the FMC Ordnance plant in South Charleston on March 22, 1966. The tracked APCs are awaiting shipping orders from the U.S. Army to be sent to battlefields and training areas throughout the world.

Known as Morton Cadillac for 18 years, the dealership changed hands and became Ed Tutwiler Cadillac in February 1959. The new franchise owner was E.M. “Ed” Tutwiler Jr., part owner and manager of Appalachian Tire Products Co. and then known throughout West Virginia as the state’s amateur gol…

In February 1972, the Elk River flowed over its banks near its junction with the Kanawha River, flooding this Raines Motor Co. storage lot. A man operating a wrecker hauled vehicles to safety. In the top background is a corner of the Civic Center parking lot. Photo by Earl Benton.

Damage following the 1972 disaster at Buffalo Creek, in Logan County. A dam securing a Pittston Coal Company coal slurry impoundment failed, destroying two other impoundments and sending more than 132 million gallons of black waste water along Buffalo Creek hollow. The catastrophic flood kil…

President John F. Kennedy arrived at Kanawha Airport (now Yeager Airport) on the rainy morning of June 20, 1963, to take part in West Virginia’s centennial celebration. Kennedy was joined in this photo by Opal Barron, wife of Gov. Wally Barron. In the background are U.S. Sen. Jennings Randol…

The Heck’s department store in Charleston’s Plaza East shopping center closed in early 1989, one of several stores closed as the Nitro-based chain tried to emerge from two years of bankruptcy. Within a year, the chain would have undergone two name changes — the Take 10 Discount Club and L.A.…

West Virginia Contractors discovered in June 1967 that there was an easier way of doing things than spending a month over a drafting table working on contract specifications for job bidding. A computer would do the same thing in less than one hour. James Ballard, seated at the console of the…

Patrolman W.S. Gammon reads a test message sent by the Charleston Police communications office on March 16, 1972. The department was experimenting with a teleprinter that sends printed messages rather than voice communication, which can be monitored by using a scanner. Photo by Chet Hawes.