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If the Supreme Court follows through on overturning Roe v. Wade, abortion will likely be banned or greatly restricted in about half of U.S. states. But experts and advocates fear repercussions could reach even further, affecting care for women who miscarry, couples seeking fertility treatments and access to some forms of contraception. Many supporters of abortion bans insist they are only interested in curtailing abortion, and legislation passed so far often has exceptions for other reproductive care. But rumblings in the GOP have doctors concerned, and laws banning abortion could also have unintended side effects.

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FILE - Casie Farnsworth wears a birth control costume as she speaks to a crowd of protesters outside Rep. Jackie Walorski's office on Nov. 9, 2017, in Mishawaka, Ind. In 2022, a leaked draft opinion indicating U.S. Supreme Court justices are poised to overturn the decision that legalized abortion nationwide in the U.S. is raising fears that restrictions on contraception could follow. (Robert Franklin/South Bend Tribune via AP, File)

AP

FILE - Margot Riphagen of New Orleans, wears a birth control pill costume as she protests in front of the Supreme Court in Washington on March 25, 2014. In 2022, a leaked draft opinion indicating U.S. Supreme Court justices are poised to overturn the decision that legalized abortion nationwide in the U.S. is raising fears that restrictions on contraception could follow. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

AP

A federal judge has blocked part of an Alabama law that makes it a felony to give gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors. U.S. District Judge Liles Burke issued a preliminary injunction on Friday to stop the state from enforcing the medication ban while a court challenge goes forward. The law took effect on May 8. Parents with transgender children and the U.S. Department of Justice have challenged the legislation as unconstitutional. The judge left in place other parts of the law that banned gender-affirming surgeries and requires school officials to tell parents if a minor discloses that they are transgender. The legislation is the first in the country to levy criminal penalties against doctors who provide the medications.

AP

FILE - In a photo provided by Jeff Walker, 15-year-old Harleigh Walker of Auburn, Ala., is seen during a family vacation. Harleigh Walker spent the spring break trying to persuade members of the state House and Senate to reject legislation banning gender-affirming medications for transgender kids like her under 19. A federal judge on Friday, May 13, 2022, has blocked part of an Alabama law that makes it a felony to give gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors. (Jeff Walker via AP)

AP

FILE - In a photo provided by Jeff Walker, he and his daughter Harleigh of Auburn, Ala., stand outside the White House on March 31, 2022, in Washington, where they were guests for Transgender Day of Visibility. Ninth grader Harleigh Walker, 15, spent her spring break trying unsuccessfully to persuade members of the state House and Senate to reject legislation banning gender-affirming medications for transgender kids like her under 19. A federal judge on Friday, May 13, 2022, has blocked part of an Alabama law that makes it a felony to give gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors. (Courtesy of Jeff Walker via AP)

AP

FILE - Dr. Morissa Ladinsky, a University of Alabama at Birmingham professor who treats patients with gender issues, speaks during an interview in Birmingham, Ala., on Wednesday, April 13, 2022. A federal judge on Friday, May 13, blocked part of an Alabama law that made it a felony to prescribe gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors. U.S. District Judge Liles Burke issued a preliminary injunction to stop the state from enforcing the medication ban, which took effect May 8, while a lawsuit goes forward. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves, FILE)

AP

FILE - Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey holds a sit down interview with reporters in the Governor's office at the Alabama State Capitol Building in Montgomery, Ala., on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021. A federal judge on Friday, May 13, 2022 blocked part of an Alabama law that made it a felony to prescribe gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors. U.S. District Judge Liles Burke issued a preliminary injunction to stop the state from enforcing the medication ban, which took effect May 8, while a lawsuit goes forward.(Jake Crandall/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP, File)

AP

FILE - Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall speaks during a news conference June 3, 2021, in Montgomery, Ala. A federal judge on Friday, May 13, blocked part of an Alabama law that makes it a felony to prescribe gender-affirming puberty blockers and hormones to transgender minors. The state attorney general’s office insists the law is constitutional and says it’s aimed at protecting children. “The science and common sense are on Alabama’s side. We will win this fight to protect our children,” Marshall said recently.(Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP, File)

AP

The Senate has fallen far short in a vote toward enshrining Roe v. Wade abortion access into federal law. Wednesday's 51-49 negative vote almost along party lines provided a stark display of the nation’s partisan divide over the landmark court decision and the limits of legislative action. The afternoon roll call promised to be the first of several efforts in Congress to preserve the nearly 50-year-old court ruling. President Joe Biden called on Congress to pass legislation that would guarantee the constitutional right to abortion services after the disclosure of a draft Supreme Court opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade. But Democrats in the split Senate lacked the votes to overcome a Republican-led filibuster.