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Fahad Shah, right, editor-in-chief of Kashmir Walla, works on his computer inside the newsroom at his office in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Jan. 21, 2022. Shah said he has been summoned by police several times and also detained once regarding his stories on Kashmir after the abrogation of article 370. Media has always been tightly controlled in India’s part of Muslim-majority Kashmir. But their situation has gotten dramatically worse since India revoked the region’s semi-autonomy in 2019, throwing Kashmir under a security and communication lockdown. Journalists have been arrested, interrogated and investigated under harsh anti-terror laws. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP

Aleena Mir, a journalist with Kashmir Walla, records the news bulletin inside a studio of her office in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Jan. 21, 2022. Journalists have long contended with various threats in Indian-controlled Kashmir and found themselves caught between warring sides. But their situation has gotten dramatically worse since India revoked the region’s semi-autonomy in 2019, throwing Kashmir under a severe security and communication lockdown and the media in a black hole. A year later, the government’s new media policy sought to control the press more effectively to censure independent reporting. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP

Kashmir Press Club building is pictured through a closed gate after it was sealed by authorities in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. Under Modi, press freedoms in India have steadily shrunk after he was first elected in 2014. Last year, India was ranked 142nd in the global press freedom index by media watchdog Reporters Without Borders, below Afghanistan and Zimbabwe. Authorities try to control any narrative seen opposite to the official line that Kashmir is an integral part of India. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP
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Kashmiri Journalists prepare for a meeting to discuss the shutting of Kashmir Press Club building, the region’s only independent press club, in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022. Local Kashmiri reporters were often the only eyes on the ground for the global audiences, particularly after New Delhi barred foreign journalists from the region without official approval a few years ago. Most of the coverage has focused on the Kashmir conflict and government crackdowns. Authorities are now seeking to control any narrative seen opposite to the broad consensus in India that the region is an integral part of the country. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP
  • Updated

Kashmiri Journalists attend a meeting to discuss the shutting of Kashmir Press Club building, the region’s only independent press club, in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2022. There have been press crackdowns in the region before, especially during periods of mass public uprisings. But the ongoing crackdown is notably worse. The Editors Guild of India accused the government of being “brazenly complicit” and dubbed it an “armed takeover.” Reporters Without Borders called it an “undeclared coup” and said the region is “steadily being transformed into a black hole for news and information.” (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP
  • Updated

Kashmiri Journalists work during surprise search of pedestrians by security forces in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Jan. 21, 2022. Local Kashmiri reporters were often the only eyes on the ground for the global audiences, particularly after New Delhi barred foreign journalists from the region without official approval a few years ago. Most of the coverage has focused on the Kashmir conflict and government crackdowns. Authorities are now seeking to control any narrative seen opposite to the broad consensus in India that the region is an integral part of the country. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP

Kashmir Press Club building is pictured through a closed gate after it was sealed by authorities in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. Last week, a few journalists supportive of the Indian government, with assistance from armed police, took control of the region’s only independent press club. Authorities shut it down a day later, drawing sharp criticism from journalist bodies. Reporters Without Borders called it an “undeclared coup” and said the region is “steadily being transformed into a black hole for news and information.” The government defended its move by citing “potential law and order situation” and “the safety of bona fide journalists.” (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP

A sealed lock hangs at the gate of the closed Kashmir Press Club building in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. Last week, a few journalists supportive of the Indian government, with assistance from armed police, took control of the region’s only independent press club. Authorities shut it down a day later, drawing sharp criticism from journalist bodies. Reporters Without Borders called it an “undeclared coup” and said the region is “steadily being transformed into a black hole for news and information.” The government defended its move by citing “potential law and order situation” and “the safety of bona fide journalists.” (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

AP

Kashmiri photojournalists work as soldiers stand guard during a surprise search of pedestrians by security forces in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Jan. 21, 2022. Journalists in Indian-controlled Kashmir have long contended with threats and found themselves caught between the authorities and rebels. But their situation has gotten dramatically worse since India revoked the region’s semi-autonomy in 2019, throwing Kashmir under a security and communication lockdown. Journalists have been arrested, interrogated and investigated under harsh anti-terror laws. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)