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Shelves that held Chef Boyardee products are partially empty at a grocery in Pittsburgh, on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022. Shortages at U.S. grocery stores have grown in recent weeks as new problems — like the fast-spreading omicron variant and severe weather — have piled on to the supply chain struggles and labor shortages that have plagued retailers since the coronavirus pandemic began. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

AP

A shopper at a grocery in Pittsburgh looks at the partially empty display of breakfast meats on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022. Shortages at U.S. grocery stores have grown in recent weeks as new problems — like the fast-spreading omicron variant and severe weather — have piled on to the supply chain struggles and labor shortages that have plagued retailers since the coronavirus pandemic began. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

AP

Shelves sit empty at a Walmart in Anchorage, Alaska, on Jan. 8, 2022. Shortages at U.S. grocery stores have grown in recent weeks as new problems — like the fast-spreading omicron variant and severe weather — have piled on to the supply chain struggles and labor shortages that have plagued retailers since the coronavirus pandemic began. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

AP

Shoppers walk past empty aisles of produce at a Safeway on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022, in Washington. Shortages at U.S. grocery stores have grown in recent weeks as new problems — like the fast-spreading omicron variant and severe weather — have piled on to the supply chain struggles and labor shortages that have plagued retailers since the coronavirus pandemic began. (AP Photo/Parker Purifoy)

AP

A display of lunch meats is restocked at a grocery in Pittsburgh on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022. Shortages at U.S. grocery stores have grown in recent weeks as new problems — like the fast-spreading omicron variant and severe weather — have piled on to the supply chain struggles and labor shortages that have plagued retailers since the coronavirus pandemic began. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar )

AP

As the raging omicron variant of COVID-19 infects workers across the nation, millions of those whose jobs don’t provide paid sick days are hav…

AP

FILE - A person waits to enter a Trader Joe's grocery store, as a shopper leaves in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles on March 24, 2020. Millions of workers whose jobs don’t provide paid sick days are having to choose between their health and their paycheck as the omicron variant of COVID-19 rages across the nation. While many companies instituted more robust sick leave policies at the beginning of the pandemic, those have since been scaled back with the rollout of the vaccines, even though the omicron variant has managed to evade them. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

AP

FILE - People wait in line for a rapid antigen test at a COVID-19 testing site in Long Beach, Calif., Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022. Millions of workers whose jobs don’t provide paid sick days are having to choose between their health and their paycheck as the omicron variant of COVID-19 rages across the nation. While many companies instituted more robust sick leave policies at the beginning of the pandemic, those have since been scaled back with the rollout of the vaccines, even though the omicron variant has managed to evade them. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

AP

FILE - Customers observe social distancing as they wait to be allowed to shop at a Trader Joe's supermarket in Omaha, Neb., May 7, 2020. Millions of workers whose jobs don’t provide paid sick days are having to choose between their health and their paycheck as the omicron variant of COVID-19 rages across the nation. While many companies instituted more robust sick leave policies at the beginning of the pandemic, those have since been scaled back with the rollout of the vaccines, even though the omicron variant has managed to evade them. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)