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This 2018 photo provided by Evan R. Buechley shows a Tawny Eagle in Ethiopia. The tawny eagle is considered vulnerable to extinction by scientists. The destruction of forests and grasslands in Africa and South Asia are shrinking its habitat. Globally the top threats to birds of prey are habitat loss, climate change and toxins in the environment. (Evan R. Buechley via AP)

AP

This undated photo provided by Evan R. Buechley in August 2021 shows a hooded vulture in Ethiopia. An analysis of data from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and BirdLife International released on Monday, Aug. 30, 2021 found that 30% of 557 raptor species worldwide are considered near threatened, vulnerable or endangered. Eighteen species are critically endangered, including the hooded vulture, researchers found. (Evan R. Buechley via AP)

AP

FILE - This Sunday, March 14, 2010 file photo shows "Girlie," a 29-year-old Philippine Eagle at the Parks and Wildlife Center at Manila's Quezon City. An analysis of data from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and BirdLife International released on Monday, Aug. 30, 2021 found that 30% of 557 raptor species worldwide are considered near threatened, vulnerable or endangered. Eighteen species are critically endangered, including the Philippine eagle, researchers found. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

AP

FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021 file photo, scientists and journalists watch as an Andean condor is released into the wild by Bolivian veterinarians, on the outskirts of Choquekhota, Bolivia, as part of a project run by a state conservation program. The Andean condor, the world's heaviest soaring bird, is declining due to exposure to pesticides, lead and other toxic substances, said Sergio Lambertucci, a biologist at the National University of Comahue in Argentina. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

AP

This 2020 photo provided by Evan R. Buechley shows a golden eagle feeding on roadkill in Utah. Gerardo Ceballos, a bird scientist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, says, “The golden eagle is the national bird of Mexico, but we have very few golden eagles left in Mexico." A 2016 census estimated only about 100 breeding pairs remain in the country. (Evan R. Buechley via AP)

AP

This June 2013 photo provided by Carlos Navarro shows a female harpy eagle and its young in a nest in Darién Province, Panama. Harpy eagles were once widespread throughout southern Mexico and Central and South America, but deforestation has dramatically shrunk their range. (Carlos Navarro via AP)